Proposal Title

Spatial ability and cognitive load demands during visual learning and testing: A transcranial Doppler ultrasound study.

Session Type

Poster

Room

PAB Atrium

Start Date

9-7-2013 5:30 PM

Keywords

visual learning, spatial ability, doppler ultrasound

Primary Threads

Teaching and Learning Science

Abstract

Determining the efficacy of learning technologies is often based solely on learning outcomes or performance of students. Technologies that fail to aid students in these outcomes are often abandoned. The present study examines the relationship between the demands of cognitive processing and the underlying physiological response. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the affects of increased cognitive processing on learner cerebral blood flow. Utilizing learners of high (HSA) and low spatial ability (LSA), we hypothesize that cognitive processing of visual information will be mitigated by spatial ability. Using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography to measure blood flow velocity, it is believed a negative correlation will exist between mean blood flow velocity and spatial ability. Similarly, a negative correlation between mean blood flow velocity and performance will exist. Overall, we believe that cognitive processing will be more efficient and effective in HSA learners.

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Jul 9th, 5:30 PM

Spatial ability and cognitive load demands during visual learning and testing: A transcranial Doppler ultrasound study.

PAB Atrium

Determining the efficacy of learning technologies is often based solely on learning outcomes or performance of students. Technologies that fail to aid students in these outcomes are often abandoned. The present study examines the relationship between the demands of cognitive processing and the underlying physiological response. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the affects of increased cognitive processing on learner cerebral blood flow. Utilizing learners of high (HSA) and low spatial ability (LSA), we hypothesize that cognitive processing of visual information will be mitigated by spatial ability. Using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography to measure blood flow velocity, it is believed a negative correlation will exist between mean blood flow velocity and spatial ability. Similarly, a negative correlation between mean blood flow velocity and performance will exist. Overall, we believe that cognitive processing will be more efficient and effective in HSA learners.