Proposal Title

The Path More Travelled: defining gaze-based approaches to spatial tasks in anatomy.

Session Type

Poster

Room

PAB Atrium

Start Date

9-7-2013 5:30 PM

Keywords

spatial ability, gaze-based analysis

Primary Threads

Teaching and Learning Science

Abstract

Spatial ability, or the ease with which individuals are able to manipulate three-dimensional structures mentally, without external assistance, is a key factor in how individuals attend, perceive, and interact with their surroundings. This ability has been linked to success in technical skill acquisition, general intelligence, and academic success, and thus, could serve as a contributor to how we can better instruct individuals. It is unclear, however, whether gaze dictates perception or if perception controls where and how individuals observe their environment. Based on studies that relate eye movement to the cognitive processes underlying spatial structure interpretation, this study aims to train gaze behaviour in individuals who lack this skill through the use of gaze tracking technology. By analyzing eye movement patterns produced by spatially adept individuals, this study aims to contribute to a strategy to train spatial ability in less proficient individuals. By extension, this study then aims to translate this training protocol to a real world educational scenario, in the spatially complex field of anatomy. It is thought that through the application of strategies derived from gaze tracking analysis, that students of low spatial ability could be instructed to view anatomical structures more effectively. This would ultimately result in improved scores on Spatial Anatomy Tests, and improved academic success as a result of gaze-based spatial ability training.

This document is currently not available here.


Share

COinS
 
Jul 9th, 5:30 PM

The Path More Travelled: defining gaze-based approaches to spatial tasks in anatomy.

PAB Atrium

Spatial ability, or the ease with which individuals are able to manipulate three-dimensional structures mentally, without external assistance, is a key factor in how individuals attend, perceive, and interact with their surroundings. This ability has been linked to success in technical skill acquisition, general intelligence, and academic success, and thus, could serve as a contributor to how we can better instruct individuals. It is unclear, however, whether gaze dictates perception or if perception controls where and how individuals observe their environment. Based on studies that relate eye movement to the cognitive processes underlying spatial structure interpretation, this study aims to train gaze behaviour in individuals who lack this skill through the use of gaze tracking technology. By analyzing eye movement patterns produced by spatially adept individuals, this study aims to contribute to a strategy to train spatial ability in less proficient individuals. By extension, this study then aims to translate this training protocol to a real world educational scenario, in the spatially complex field of anatomy. It is thought that through the application of strategies derived from gaze tracking analysis, that students of low spatial ability could be instructed to view anatomical structures more effectively. This would ultimately result in improved scores on Spatial Anatomy Tests, and improved academic success as a result of gaze-based spatial ability training.