Proposal Title

Use of Nutrition-Related Case-Based Learning Modules to Facilitate Learning in a 2nd Year Biochemistry Course at the University of Guelph

Session Type

Poster

Room

PAB Atrium

Start Date

9-7-2013 5:30 PM

Keywords

Case-based learning, curriculum, CBL, nutrition, biochemistry, active learning

Primary Threads

Curriculum

Abstract

Studies indicate that the majority of students in undergraduate biochemistry take a surface approach to learning, associated with rote memorization of material, rather than a deep approach, which implies higher cognitive processing. This behavior is associated with poorer outcomes, including impaired course performance and reduced knowledge retention. The use of case-based-learning (CBL), a sub-type of problem-based-learning (PBL), and the incorporation of nutrition content into biochemistry teaching may facilitate deep learning by increasing student engagement and interest. This long-term project, aims to modifying the curriculum in an undergraduate Biochemistry course to be focused around nutrition-related cases. The goal is to determine if nutrition-related CBL modules encourage deep learning (measured by R-SPQ-2F), improves student performance (measured by the accuracy of student performance across exam questions using Bloom’s taxonomy), long-term retention (measured by a retention test targeting key Biochemistry concepts) and the student perception of the course experience (measured by the Course Experience Questionnaire). This poster will describe the process of development of the modules, including: (1) types of CBL and how these can be incorporated into undergraduate education, (2) the specific CBL framework adopted for this project and justification for its selection, and (3) examples of developed case studies highlighting the elements designed to facilitate deep learning. While this project is focused specifically on undergraduate biochemistry education, our findings can facilitate adopting CBL with nutrition content to other courses. Consequently, the information presented herein will be of value to undergraduate science educators with an interest in active learning curriculum development.

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Jul 9th, 5:30 PM

Use of Nutrition-Related Case-Based Learning Modules to Facilitate Learning in a 2nd Year Biochemistry Course at the University of Guelph

PAB Atrium

Studies indicate that the majority of students in undergraduate biochemistry take a surface approach to learning, associated with rote memorization of material, rather than a deep approach, which implies higher cognitive processing. This behavior is associated with poorer outcomes, including impaired course performance and reduced knowledge retention. The use of case-based-learning (CBL), a sub-type of problem-based-learning (PBL), and the incorporation of nutrition content into biochemistry teaching may facilitate deep learning by increasing student engagement and interest. This long-term project, aims to modifying the curriculum in an undergraduate Biochemistry course to be focused around nutrition-related cases. The goal is to determine if nutrition-related CBL modules encourage deep learning (measured by R-SPQ-2F), improves student performance (measured by the accuracy of student performance across exam questions using Bloom’s taxonomy), long-term retention (measured by a retention test targeting key Biochemistry concepts) and the student perception of the course experience (measured by the Course Experience Questionnaire). This poster will describe the process of development of the modules, including: (1) types of CBL and how these can be incorporated into undergraduate education, (2) the specific CBL framework adopted for this project and justification for its selection, and (3) examples of developed case studies highlighting the elements designed to facilitate deep learning. While this project is focused specifically on undergraduate biochemistry education, our findings can facilitate adopting CBL with nutrition content to other courses. Consequently, the information presented herein will be of value to undergraduate science educators with an interest in active learning curriculum development.