Proposal Title

Using a creativity-based assignment to improve science communication skills and overcome misconceptions

Session Type

Presentation

Room

P&A 34

Start Date

5-7-2017 3:05 PM

Keywords

creativity-based assignment, science communication, educational intervention, antibiotic resistance

Primary Threads

Teaching and Learning Science

Abstract

There are many desired outcomes of science undergraduate education, such as knowledge acquisition and development of science process skills. How can we achieve these outcomes in meaningful ways for students? We present here a novel creativity-based assignment and course experience that has the following goals: (1) Improve student science communication skills; (2) Increase student awareness of topical science content (in this case, antibiotic-resistance, ABR); (3) Assist students in self-identifying their own science misconceptions; and (4) Overcome persistent misconceptions. Students enrolled in an Introductory Genetics class at the University of Toronto Mississauga were instructed to consult the peer-reviewed literature, select a public misconception about ABR, and create an animation targeting the public to overcome this misconception. Pre- and post-testing showed resolution of persistent student ABR misconceptions. The outcomes of this session are to: (1) shed light on the role of such activities in the elimination of misconceptions; (2) discuss and share teaching and learning strategies involving creativity-based assignments; (3) discuss and share progress and pitfalls of incorporating creativity-based assignments into large classes; (4) showcase a selection of student creative work; and (5) encourage audience participation in the active learning assessment strategies that were used with this assignment.

Elements of Engagement

Engagement would be showing different types of animations with audience and discussing how development of science communication skills was evidenced by the animations. Additionally, the audience will participate in self-identification of their own ABR misconceptions.

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Jul 5th, 3:05 PM

Using a creativity-based assignment to improve science communication skills and overcome misconceptions

P&A 34

There are many desired outcomes of science undergraduate education, such as knowledge acquisition and development of science process skills. How can we achieve these outcomes in meaningful ways for students? We present here a novel creativity-based assignment and course experience that has the following goals: (1) Improve student science communication skills; (2) Increase student awareness of topical science content (in this case, antibiotic-resistance, ABR); (3) Assist students in self-identifying their own science misconceptions; and (4) Overcome persistent misconceptions. Students enrolled in an Introductory Genetics class at the University of Toronto Mississauga were instructed to consult the peer-reviewed literature, select a public misconception about ABR, and create an animation targeting the public to overcome this misconception. Pre- and post-testing showed resolution of persistent student ABR misconceptions. The outcomes of this session are to: (1) shed light on the role of such activities in the elimination of misconceptions; (2) discuss and share teaching and learning strategies involving creativity-based assignments; (3) discuss and share progress and pitfalls of incorporating creativity-based assignments into large classes; (4) showcase a selection of student creative work; and (5) encourage audience participation in the active learning assessment strategies that were used with this assignment.