Proposal Title

Examining the effects of different teaching modalities on the motivation and academic performance of students in human anatomy and physiology class

Session Type

Presentation

Room

P&A 150

Start Date

6-7-2017 4:10 PM

Keywords

teaching modality, motivation, academic performance, case study, video, problems

Primary Threads

Evaluation of Learning

Abstract

Students typically perform at a higher level under problem-based learning if the proper support systems are provided to encourage student success. The role of the instructor in problem-based learning is to provide students with a way to balance the level of difficulty and the degree of interest to best understand, remember and connect with the material. One way this balance may be accomplished is by introducing problems through different teaching modalities during the learning process. We examined the effects of various teaching modalities in problem-based learning on student motivation and academic performance in Foundations of Human Anatomy and Physiology course (BIO210) at University of Toronto Mississauga. The course instructor used a different teaching modality to introduce a problem but no other curriculum changes were made in each unit that was taught . Teaching modalities included videos for respiratory system unit, case studies for urinary system unit, and salient disease problems for reproductive system unit. We administered an online pre- and post- motivation survey for all units. In addition to survey data, we collected class means of term test grades for each unit.  We observed an increase in motivation from 3 to 3.31 on Likert scale for the visual video modality introduced in the respiratory system unit. Although we did not make direct comparisons about student motivation across academic years, we did note that students in this academic year (2016/17) performed slightly better (64%) than students in the previous academic years (2014-16; 63%) on term tests questions related to the respiratory system unit. Although data on other teaching modalities is still being collected, our results from the respiratory system implies that both motivation and academic performance increases for students that have been exposed to the content through the video teaching modality.

Elements of Engagement

Ask professors in audience about their experience in teaching. Give interactive examples of potential issues in motivating students in lecture. Ask (former) students about their learning experience. Give interactive examples of potential issues lecture engagement. Discuss our own experiences (self-reflection). End presentation with 5 minutes of Q&A or a short panel discussion.

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Jul 6th, 4:10 PM

Examining the effects of different teaching modalities on the motivation and academic performance of students in human anatomy and physiology class

P&A 150

Students typically perform at a higher level under problem-based learning if the proper support systems are provided to encourage student success. The role of the instructor in problem-based learning is to provide students with a way to balance the level of difficulty and the degree of interest to best understand, remember and connect with the material. One way this balance may be accomplished is by introducing problems through different teaching modalities during the learning process. We examined the effects of various teaching modalities in problem-based learning on student motivation and academic performance in Foundations of Human Anatomy and Physiology course (BIO210) at University of Toronto Mississauga. The course instructor used a different teaching modality to introduce a problem but no other curriculum changes were made in each unit that was taught . Teaching modalities included videos for respiratory system unit, case studies for urinary system unit, and salient disease problems for reproductive system unit. We administered an online pre- and post- motivation survey for all units. In addition to survey data, we collected class means of term test grades for each unit.  We observed an increase in motivation from 3 to 3.31 on Likert scale for the visual video modality introduced in the respiratory system unit. Although we did not make direct comparisons about student motivation across academic years, we did note that students in this academic year (2016/17) performed slightly better (64%) than students in the previous academic years (2014-16; 63%) on term tests questions related to the respiratory system unit. Although data on other teaching modalities is still being collected, our results from the respiratory system implies that both motivation and academic performance increases for students that have been exposed to the content through the video teaching modality.