Session Type

Presentation

Room

P&A 34

Start Date

6-7-2017 11:10 AM

Keywords

video, animations, misconceptions, learning

Primary Threads

Education Technologies and Innovative Resources

Abstract

The use of traditional animations in biology-based courses to explain scientific processes has increased significantly over the last number of years, however their effectiveness in undergraduate learning is still not completely clear. In addition, the best approach to using and implementing these videos to harvest their true learning potential for students is still up for debate. We have recently started to explore the answers to these questions in the Human Biology Program at the University of Toronto using a novel approach. Two versions of animated biology video content were developed in three different undergraduate courses: one version that was “traditional” correctly explaining a theory, process or study and one version that used “planned misconceptions” or “mistakes” explaining the same theory, process or study. The approach to using and evaluating these two versions of videos in each course were all unique and spanned a variety of science disciplines. In turn, this provided an opportunity to gauge if there were advantages of using one style of animation over the other, which animation styles students were more comfortable with and which animation styles generated greater student engagement. All of these points will be discussed but most importantly we will attempt to identify which video version, “traditional” or “mistake” better reinforced student learning of key concepts. Finally, audience engagement will be solicited through the viewing of small clips from both video versions (in varying order) and going through small working exercises (e.g. iclicker) to gauge understanding of key concepts in each course example.

Elements of Engagement

  • Audience engagement will be solicited through the viewing of small clips from both video versions (traditional and mistake) and going through small working exercises (e.g. multiple choice questions with iclickers) to gauge understanding of key concepts in each course example.
  • We will also pose design questions after watching a "traditional" correct video clip. Asking audience members to identify areas of where mistakes could be introduced to help students learn course material. This may help guide participants when creating their own "mistake" version videos


Share

COinS
 
Jul 6th, 11:10 AM

Learning from a MISTAKE (MISconception Teaching Animations in Knowledge Extension)

P&A 34

The use of traditional animations in biology-based courses to explain scientific processes has increased significantly over the last number of years, however their effectiveness in undergraduate learning is still not completely clear. In addition, the best approach to using and implementing these videos to harvest their true learning potential for students is still up for debate. We have recently started to explore the answers to these questions in the Human Biology Program at the University of Toronto using a novel approach. Two versions of animated biology video content were developed in three different undergraduate courses: one version that was “traditional” correctly explaining a theory, process or study and one version that used “planned misconceptions” or “mistakes” explaining the same theory, process or study. The approach to using and evaluating these two versions of videos in each course were all unique and spanned a variety of science disciplines. In turn, this provided an opportunity to gauge if there were advantages of using one style of animation over the other, which animation styles students were more comfortable with and which animation styles generated greater student engagement. All of these points will be discussed but most importantly we will attempt to identify which video version, “traditional” or “mistake” better reinforced student learning of key concepts. Finally, audience engagement will be solicited through the viewing of small clips from both video versions (in varying order) and going through small working exercises (e.g. iclicker) to gauge understanding of key concepts in each course example.