Proposal Title

Reaching beyond the tower walls: How do we train students to communicate science outside of academia?

Session Type

Panel Discussion

Room

P&A 34

Start Date

6-7-2017 1:45 PM

Keywords

science communication, graduate education, undergraduate education, professional development, transferable skill

Primary Threads

None of the Above

Abstract

Elizabeth J Hundey, Western University

Stephanie Barbon, Western University

Aniruddho Chokroborty-Hoque, Western University

Ariel Frame, Western University

Dennis He, Western University

Keith Marnoch, Western University

Paul Ragogna, Western University

Abstract

Scientists, governments, funding agencies, professional societies, and policy makers agree that science communication is a critical component of science itself (Trench & Miller, 2012). Science communication to diverse public audiences has potential to accelerate discovery (Lubchenco, 1998) and provides societal benefits (McGarvey & Mason, 2015). The benefits to scientists in engaging in science communication are numerous, including that science-related careers in government, industry, education and academia benefit from effective communication to diverse audiences.

Given the importance of science communication and the diversity of science careers, we have invited 6 members of the university community (including undergraduate (He) and graduate students (Barbon & Frame), a faculty member (Ragogna), a science writer (Chokroborty-Hoque), and the Director of Media and Community Relations (Marnoch) to share their interest and experience in science communication and training. Audience members will be given the opportunity to ask questions of the panel.

By the end of the panel, participants will be able to reflect upon current practices in training in science communication, and consider future possible approaches to improving science communication training in higher education. Participants will appreciate the impacts (challenges and benefits) of diversifying training to include science communication from experiences relayed by the panelists.

Lubchenco, J. 1998. Science 279. doi:10.1126/science.279.5350.491

McGarvey, D. J., and C. A. Mason. 2015. Limnol. Oceanogr. Bull. 24. doi:10.1002/lob.10007

Trench, B., and S. Miller. 2012. Sci. Public Policy 39. doi:10.1093/scipol/scs090

Elements of Engagement

Following 15 minutes of session context and panellist introductions, panellists will respond to a combination of prepopulated and audience questions. The session organizer will meet with panellists beforehand to provide prompting questions for their introductions and to ensure panellists have an idea of their unique contributions.

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Jul 6th, 1:45 PM

Reaching beyond the tower walls: How do we train students to communicate science outside of academia?

P&A 34

Elizabeth J Hundey, Western University

Stephanie Barbon, Western University

Aniruddho Chokroborty-Hoque, Western University

Ariel Frame, Western University

Dennis He, Western University

Keith Marnoch, Western University

Paul Ragogna, Western University

Abstract

Scientists, governments, funding agencies, professional societies, and policy makers agree that science communication is a critical component of science itself (Trench & Miller, 2012). Science communication to diverse public audiences has potential to accelerate discovery (Lubchenco, 1998) and provides societal benefits (McGarvey & Mason, 2015). The benefits to scientists in engaging in science communication are numerous, including that science-related careers in government, industry, education and academia benefit from effective communication to diverse audiences.

Given the importance of science communication and the diversity of science careers, we have invited 6 members of the university community (including undergraduate (He) and graduate students (Barbon & Frame), a faculty member (Ragogna), a science writer (Chokroborty-Hoque), and the Director of Media and Community Relations (Marnoch) to share their interest and experience in science communication and training. Audience members will be given the opportunity to ask questions of the panel.

By the end of the panel, participants will be able to reflect upon current practices in training in science communication, and consider future possible approaches to improving science communication training in higher education. Participants will appreciate the impacts (challenges and benefits) of diversifying training to include science communication from experiences relayed by the panelists.

Lubchenco, J. 1998. Science 279. doi:10.1126/science.279.5350.491

McGarvey, D. J., and C. A. Mason. 2015. Limnol. Oceanogr. Bull. 24. doi:10.1002/lob.10007

Trench, B., and S. Miller. 2012. Sci. Public Policy 39. doi:10.1093/scipol/scs090