Proposal Title

Adapting lesson delivery to accommodate changing classroom sizes

Session Type

Presentation

Room

P&A 34

Start Date

7-7-2017 2:20 PM

Keywords

class size, student motivation, community, active-learning

Primary Threads

Teaching and Learning Science

Abstract

Research indicates that class size may influence student achievement (Dillon et al., 2002). So how does one adapt the delivery of course content in larger classes so that student achievement is not negatively impacted? While some may advocate for smaller classes, university lecturers typically do not have control over the size of their classes. An alternative is to focus on increasing student motivation and creating a sense of community. In this presentation, I will present observations garnered from teaching an introductory programming class to three different class sizes (i.e., 50, 100, and 25 students). I will also discuss strategies that proved effective in creating a sense of community and motivating students. In this session, the audience will be shown how a shift from a primarily lecture-based format to an active learning style was implemented in the different classes. As a focus on learning instead of teaching has the potential to impact student achievement (Weimer, 2003) this research is of benefit to anyone confronted with changing class sizes. Innovative methods for measuring student motivation during the semester will also be discussed.

Dillon et al. (2002). Retrieved from https://www.ilr.cornell.edu/sites/ilr.cornell.edu/files/WP28.pdf

Weimer (2003). Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, 35(5), 48–54.

Elements of Engagement

I will model some of the peer interaction techniques used in the class and have participants engage in group exercises designed to foster a sense of community. In addition, participants will be given opportunities to reflect on how they can adapt their lecture sessions to foster community and improve student motivation regardless of the class size.

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Jul 7th, 2:20 PM

Adapting lesson delivery to accommodate changing classroom sizes

P&A 34

Research indicates that class size may influence student achievement (Dillon et al., 2002). So how does one adapt the delivery of course content in larger classes so that student achievement is not negatively impacted? While some may advocate for smaller classes, university lecturers typically do not have control over the size of their classes. An alternative is to focus on increasing student motivation and creating a sense of community. In this presentation, I will present observations garnered from teaching an introductory programming class to three different class sizes (i.e., 50, 100, and 25 students). I will also discuss strategies that proved effective in creating a sense of community and motivating students. In this session, the audience will be shown how a shift from a primarily lecture-based format to an active learning style was implemented in the different classes. As a focus on learning instead of teaching has the potential to impact student achievement (Weimer, 2003) this research is of benefit to anyone confronted with changing class sizes. Innovative methods for measuring student motivation during the semester will also be discussed.

Dillon et al. (2002). Retrieved from https://www.ilr.cornell.edu/sites/ilr.cornell.edu/files/WP28.pdf

Weimer (2003). Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, 35(5), 48–54.