Proposal Title

Two-stage testing: advantages, perceived limitations, and how to apply it in your classroom

Session Type

Presentation

Room

P&A 148

Start Date

7-7-2017 2:20 PM

Keywords

assessment, two-stage testing, collaborative testing, formative assessment, immediate feedback

Primary Threads

Evaluation of Learning

Abstract

Although all career paths involve collaborative problem solving, student learning is typically assessed individually. We have embraced the method of two-stage testing, where students first solve a test individually, and then solve the same test in groups. Each student's grade is calculated as a weighted average of the individual and group scores (Gilley & Clarkston, 2014).

Two-stage testing has been used in a variety of disciplines across sciences: physics, chemistry, biology, environmental sciences, nursing, computer science, psychology, and medicine (Gilley & Clarkston, 2014; Jang et al., 2017).

Advantages to two-stage testing include improved performance and long-term retention, reduced test-taking anxiety, and immediate feedback from other classmates. Importantly, while conventional assessments attempt to characterize a student's knowledge, two-stage testing provides a dynamic learning opportunity during the assessment (Jang et al., 2017).

Our presentation is geared towards those who have heard of two-stage testing and who are considering applying it in their classrooms. Those who have never heard of it before are also welcome and we can quickly explain the idea through an interactive experiment. Those who have tried two-stage testing are also welcome to share their experiences. We will engage in a brainstorming session to pinpoint audience members' concerns about applying two-stage testing in their classrooms. We will then address whatever concerns are most pressing by highlighting our experiences at Ryerson University. This will include the logistics of two-stage testing with respect to any/all of the following: efficient use of time, test format (multiple choice, short answer, fill-in-the-blanks, etc.), class size (from 1000 students), academic integrity, accessibility considerations, and alternative testing options using technology.

Gilley & Clarkston (2014). Research and Teaching, 43(3), 83-91.

Jang et al. (2017). American Journal of Physics, 85(3), 223-227.

Elements of Engagement

We will have a brainstorming session in which audience members will list any concerns they have about applying two-stage testing in their own classrooms. Following this, we will present our own experiences in two-stage testing at Ryerson University to address the most pressing of these concerns (as determined by a vote after the brainstorming session).

In the event that our audience consists of newcomers who are unfamiliar with the technique of two-stage testing, we will also have an actual two-stage test to showcase how to apply it in the classroom.

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Jul 7th, 2:20 PM

Two-stage testing: advantages, perceived limitations, and how to apply it in your classroom

P&A 148

Although all career paths involve collaborative problem solving, student learning is typically assessed individually. We have embraced the method of two-stage testing, where students first solve a test individually, and then solve the same test in groups. Each student's grade is calculated as a weighted average of the individual and group scores (Gilley & Clarkston, 2014).

Two-stage testing has been used in a variety of disciplines across sciences: physics, chemistry, biology, environmental sciences, nursing, computer science, psychology, and medicine (Gilley & Clarkston, 2014; Jang et al., 2017).

Advantages to two-stage testing include improved performance and long-term retention, reduced test-taking anxiety, and immediate feedback from other classmates. Importantly, while conventional assessments attempt to characterize a student's knowledge, two-stage testing provides a dynamic learning opportunity during the assessment (Jang et al., 2017).

Our presentation is geared towards those who have heard of two-stage testing and who are considering applying it in their classrooms. Those who have never heard of it before are also welcome and we can quickly explain the idea through an interactive experiment. Those who have tried two-stage testing are also welcome to share their experiences. We will engage in a brainstorming session to pinpoint audience members' concerns about applying two-stage testing in their classrooms. We will then address whatever concerns are most pressing by highlighting our experiences at Ryerson University. This will include the logistics of two-stage testing with respect to any/all of the following: efficient use of time, test format (multiple choice, short answer, fill-in-the-blanks, etc.), class size (from 1000 students), academic integrity, accessibility considerations, and alternative testing options using technology.

Gilley & Clarkston (2014). Research and Teaching, 43(3), 83-91.

Jang et al. (2017). American Journal of Physics, 85(3), 223-227.