Proposal Title

How much stress is enough for students when re-designing the curriculum and courses?

Session Type

Panel Discussion

Room

P&A 148

Start Date

7-7-2017 10:45 AM

Keywords

stress, learning, course re-design, barriers to learning

Primary Threads

Teaching and Learning Science

Abstract

Although originally described for second language acquisition, Stephen Krashen hypothesized that learning can be impeded by emotional variables that act as learning "acquisition filters" and that the largest emotional component involves stress (Krashen, 1982). Still other research has shown that some psychological stress can be beneficial for overcoming challenges but high levels of stress are detrimental to the cognitive domain of memory and recall (Tomaka et al., 1997). In light of these contrasting views of the importance and impact of stress, how do educators and administrators take in to account student stress within courses and the impact on their learning? Should all programs and courses undertake to lower "stress barriers" to enhance learning or would this negatively impact other forms of learning in a course or program? What is the student viewpoint on how courses and curricula could be re-designed? Should instructors and programs/departments even be concerned with managing stress levels for students? In this panel, we will identify both common and uncommon student stressors, highlight some of the corresponding changes made at the 3rd year level in the neuroscience program, the successes and challenges and how this relates to student mental health. Although the primary outcome of this panel discussion is to create discourse around the suggested topics listed above, we hope to engage the broader teaching community across disciplines in issues related to the impact of student stress and also allow time for participants to identify both visible and invisible student stressors, network with other participants and to continue these discussions within their own units.

Krashen (1982). Principles and practice in second language acquisition. Permagon.

Tomaka et al. (1997). Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 73(1), 63-72.

Elements of Engagement

  • This will be run as an interactive panel where individuals will be asked to identify what they believe are barriers to student learning, what stressors are common to undergraduate students
  • We will provide an online worksheet that will be filled out by participants in this panel discussion


WE WOULD LOVE TO HAVE OTHER INSTITUTIONAL PARTNERS WHO MIGHT BE INTERESTED IN SIMILAR TOPICS

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Jul 7th, 10:45 AM

How much stress is enough for students when re-designing the curriculum and courses?

P&A 148

Although originally described for second language acquisition, Stephen Krashen hypothesized that learning can be impeded by emotional variables that act as learning "acquisition filters" and that the largest emotional component involves stress (Krashen, 1982). Still other research has shown that some psychological stress can be beneficial for overcoming challenges but high levels of stress are detrimental to the cognitive domain of memory and recall (Tomaka et al., 1997). In light of these contrasting views of the importance and impact of stress, how do educators and administrators take in to account student stress within courses and the impact on their learning? Should all programs and courses undertake to lower "stress barriers" to enhance learning or would this negatively impact other forms of learning in a course or program? What is the student viewpoint on how courses and curricula could be re-designed? Should instructors and programs/departments even be concerned with managing stress levels for students? In this panel, we will identify both common and uncommon student stressors, highlight some of the corresponding changes made at the 3rd year level in the neuroscience program, the successes and challenges and how this relates to student mental health. Although the primary outcome of this panel discussion is to create discourse around the suggested topics listed above, we hope to engage the broader teaching community across disciplines in issues related to the impact of student stress and also allow time for participants to identify both visible and invisible student stressors, network with other participants and to continue these discussions within their own units.

Krashen (1982). Principles and practice in second language acquisition. Permagon.

Tomaka et al. (1997). Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 73(1), 63-72.