Session Type

Presentation

Room

P&A 34

Start Date

7-7-2017 1:00 PM

Keywords

partially-populated notes, pedagogy, mathematics, success, retention, shared-writing, peer-learning, survey, qualitative, quantitative

Primary Threads

Teaching and Learning Science

Abstract

Pedagogical innovation in post-secondary mathematics has not progressed at the same rate as other disciplines. Recent poor results in international standardized testing and a high number of students failing in post-secondary mathematics, among other factors, has created an urgent need to examine post-secondary mathematics pedagogy and innovations in student-centred curricula, assessment and teaching practices.

In this research, we explored the use of partially-populated notes (PPNs) in a first-year calculus course, and we consider PPNs to likely be an effective teaching method in many other disciplines in Science. PPNs are lecture notes containing pre-filled low-level content and have strategically placed empty spaces for students to fill-in during class time with the instructor. The method affords great time savings on low-level material, leaving more time/attention to be spent on challenging course material and learning activities. In terms of effectiveness, qualitative analysis (Tonkes et al, 2009) has been done and here we examine both qualitative and quantitative aspects of using PPNs. Student data (both in-course and high school) were considered when comparing two sections of a calculus course (1-control class and 2-PPN class) in order to measure the effect of the PPNs. Other variables were also considered: participation in remediation, lab results, and placement test scores.

Comparative data will be presented, as well as results from an exit survey measuring the student experience. We will also share examples of PPNs, discuss the important factors of successful writing in undergraduate Science courses, and discuss the instructor perspective.

Tonkes et al. (2009). International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 40(4), 495-504.

Elements of Engagement

In this session, time will be dedicated to discussion (as a group) on the topic of how innovations in teaching, like PPNs, can be utilized effectively in the post-secondary Science classroom. In this discussion, some key aspects to consider will be:

1) How to effectively use class time using alternative teaching methods like PPNs (compared to instructor speaking more than 90% of the time), by introducing more engaging in-class activities;

2) Altering teaching methods to meet the needs of the students;

3) A balance of aspects (1) and (2);

4) The time commitment/pressure placed on course instructors to alter their practice of teaching.


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Jul 7th, 1:00 PM

Measuring the effects of using partially-populated notes in first-year calculus

P&A 34

Pedagogical innovation in post-secondary mathematics has not progressed at the same rate as other disciplines. Recent poor results in international standardized testing and a high number of students failing in post-secondary mathematics, among other factors, has created an urgent need to examine post-secondary mathematics pedagogy and innovations in student-centred curricula, assessment and teaching practices.

In this research, we explored the use of partially-populated notes (PPNs) in a first-year calculus course, and we consider PPNs to likely be an effective teaching method in many other disciplines in Science. PPNs are lecture notes containing pre-filled low-level content and have strategically placed empty spaces for students to fill-in during class time with the instructor. The method affords great time savings on low-level material, leaving more time/attention to be spent on challenging course material and learning activities. In terms of effectiveness, qualitative analysis (Tonkes et al, 2009) has been done and here we examine both qualitative and quantitative aspects of using PPNs. Student data (both in-course and high school) were considered when comparing two sections of a calculus course (1-control class and 2-PPN class) in order to measure the effect of the PPNs. Other variables were also considered: participation in remediation, lab results, and placement test scores.

Comparative data will be presented, as well as results from an exit survey measuring the student experience. We will also share examples of PPNs, discuss the important factors of successful writing in undergraduate Science courses, and discuss the instructor perspective.

Tonkes et al. (2009). International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 40(4), 495-504.