Proposal Title

Instructor-Directed vs. Supported Self-directed Learning in human anatomy laboratories: Performance, Preference and Perceived Self-Efficacy in undergraduate students

Session Type

Presentation

Room

P&A Rm 106

Start Date

July 2015

Keywords

human anatomy laboratory, instructor-directed learning, self-directed learning, academic performance, student perceptions, self-efficacy

Primary Threads

Teaching and Learning Science

Abstract

There is a growing interest in the engagement of science students through self-supported learning. Medical students demonstrate greater satisfaction and performance in response to self-directed learning strategies in anatomy courses, and we were interested to see if this translated to an undergraduate population. The purpose of this study was to investigate the performance, preference, and perceived self-efficacy of undergraduate students in human anatomy laboratories to determine if they agree with the outcomes shown in medical students. Two undergraduate anatomy laboratories led by teaching assistants (TA) were examined at York University, one with an instructor-directed learning environment (TA demonstrated structures) and one supported self-directed learning environment (students used a lab manual to guide their own examination of structures; TA was available for questions). Performance was assessed on a bell-ringer style test, while preferences and perceived self-efficacy were assessed using a questionnaire. Undergraduate health science students in human anatomy laboratories have higher performance, preference and perceived self-efficacy with instructor led learning.

In this presentation, participants will be involved in an exercise to experience both instructor-directed and self-directed learning. Questions will be posed to the audience to allow them to gauge the differences in their performance and make conclusions about their perceptions of the two teaching methods. This exercise will be followed by delving into the current literature on instructor-directed and self-directed learning, describing our study in more detail, including the two laboratory setups and methods of assessment, along with potential confounders in the study and its application to other courses.

Elements of Engagement

We are very interested in gathering together and creating a learning environment to improve the understanding of the effects that teaching approaches have on student performance, perception, and self-efficacy. We will simulate a learning environment where the audience can experience both instructor-directed and self-directed learning. Questions will be posed to the audience to allow them to gauge the difference in their performance and make conclusions about their perceptions of the two teaching methods. This exercise will demonstrate that the mode of student learning is of paramount importance for academic success, as well as showcase its ability to be applied across many disciplines. We plan to have an iPad available with a very short survey for conference participants to provide feedback on the two methods and their preferred learning strategy.

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Jul 8th, 4:30 PM

Instructor-Directed vs. Supported Self-directed Learning in human anatomy laboratories: Performance, Preference and Perceived Self-Efficacy in undergraduate students

P&A Rm 106

There is a growing interest in the engagement of science students through self-supported learning. Medical students demonstrate greater satisfaction and performance in response to self-directed learning strategies in anatomy courses, and we were interested to see if this translated to an undergraduate population. The purpose of this study was to investigate the performance, preference, and perceived self-efficacy of undergraduate students in human anatomy laboratories to determine if they agree with the outcomes shown in medical students. Two undergraduate anatomy laboratories led by teaching assistants (TA) were examined at York University, one with an instructor-directed learning environment (TA demonstrated structures) and one supported self-directed learning environment (students used a lab manual to guide their own examination of structures; TA was available for questions). Performance was assessed on a bell-ringer style test, while preferences and perceived self-efficacy were assessed using a questionnaire. Undergraduate health science students in human anatomy laboratories have higher performance, preference and perceived self-efficacy with instructor led learning.

In this presentation, participants will be involved in an exercise to experience both instructor-directed and self-directed learning. Questions will be posed to the audience to allow them to gauge the differences in their performance and make conclusions about their perceptions of the two teaching methods. This exercise will be followed by delving into the current literature on instructor-directed and self-directed learning, describing our study in more detail, including the two laboratory setups and methods of assessment, along with potential confounders in the study and its application to other courses.