Proposal Title

A Model to Incorporate Meaningful Community Engaged Learning Opportunities into Large Courses.

Session Type

Presentation

Room

P&A Rm 150

Start Date

July 2015

Keywords

community engagement, knowledge translation, knowledge mobilization, creative assessments, large classes, colaboration

Primary Threads

Teaching and Learning Science

Abstract

Community engaged learning (CEL) has been identified as a high impact educational practice that can have profound influence on student learning1. Students who participate in CEL have been shown to retain, integrate and transfer information at higher rates and report higher levels of satisfaction and engagement1. Despite the potential to provide a meaningful learning experience, CEL opportunities are not widespread at research institutions, and most examples arise from small classes in social sciences2. Current realities of increasing class sizes coupled with decreasing resources make implementing CEL challenging. However, institutional accountability to deliver key learning outcomes, plus student demand for relevant curriculum across disciplines makes the challenge worthwhile. Creative thinking is required to modify the critical elements of successful CEL to suit broader educational needs.

Based on key concepts of reciprocity, shared decision-making and mutual benefit we designed a novel CEL assignment in a 4th year kinesiology class (>100 students). Briefly, student teams researched one of five priority areas identified by Wellington Dufferin Guelph Public Health (WDGPH), to write an evidence-based literature review. Based on these findings, students worked with WDGPH (ratio ~ 1:20) to translate their research into practical recommendations and useful tools to advance WDGPH programming. Knowledge translation projects were highlighted during an end of semester open showcase.

This presentation will provide a tangible model that can be modified to suit various teaching environments. Successes and challenges will be shared from faculty and community perspectives and top student projects will be available for participants to experience.

1) Kuh, G.D. (2008) High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access To Them, and Why They Matter. Association of American Colleges and Universities.

2) Hollander, EL (2011) Civic education in research universities: leaders or followers? Education + Trainaing 53:(2/3):166-176

Elements of Engagement

We will have at least 2 presenters sharing experiences from multiple perspectives. Our goal is to also include a student in the presentation, although the student's name was not available at time of abstract submission.

We will use brainstorming discussions to identify potential barriers to using CEL and draw from the audience and presenters experience to come up with practical solutions.

We will also have completed student projects to pass around the audience for participants to appreciate the outcomes of this work.

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Jul 8th, 4:30 PM

A Model to Incorporate Meaningful Community Engaged Learning Opportunities into Large Courses.

P&A Rm 150

Community engaged learning (CEL) has been identified as a high impact educational practice that can have profound influence on student learning1. Students who participate in CEL have been shown to retain, integrate and transfer information at higher rates and report higher levels of satisfaction and engagement1. Despite the potential to provide a meaningful learning experience, CEL opportunities are not widespread at research institutions, and most examples arise from small classes in social sciences2. Current realities of increasing class sizes coupled with decreasing resources make implementing CEL challenging. However, institutional accountability to deliver key learning outcomes, plus student demand for relevant curriculum across disciplines makes the challenge worthwhile. Creative thinking is required to modify the critical elements of successful CEL to suit broader educational needs.

Based on key concepts of reciprocity, shared decision-making and mutual benefit we designed a novel CEL assignment in a 4th year kinesiology class (>100 students). Briefly, student teams researched one of five priority areas identified by Wellington Dufferin Guelph Public Health (WDGPH), to write an evidence-based literature review. Based on these findings, students worked with WDGPH (ratio ~ 1:20) to translate their research into practical recommendations and useful tools to advance WDGPH programming. Knowledge translation projects were highlighted during an end of semester open showcase.

This presentation will provide a tangible model that can be modified to suit various teaching environments. Successes and challenges will be shared from faculty and community perspectives and top student projects will be available for participants to experience.

1) Kuh, G.D. (2008) High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access To Them, and Why They Matter. Association of American Colleges and Universities.

2) Hollander, EL (2011) Civic education in research universities: leaders or followers? Education + Trainaing 53:(2/3):166-176