Proposal Title

Annotation Innovation

Session Type

Presentation

Room

P&A Rm 34

Start Date

July 2015

Keywords

annotation, undergraduate, graduate, information literacy, authentic learning, primary literature, scientific writing

Primary Threads

Teaching and Learning Science

Abstract

The skill of annotating sources is undervalued and undersubscribed in higher education despite the large volume of literature extolling its virtues. Instructors who have brought annotations into the curriculum have reported a dramatic drop in plagiarism rates, higher quality of sources, and more effective research strategies (Flaspohler et al. 2007). If annotations and writing are rarely incorporated into undergraduate programs, and students enter undergraduate science programs with little practice in reading, comprehension, and writing, then where does this leave our students when they enter graduate school? We have solutions that can be implemented at any level, to any degree of complexity, and to the benefit of students, instructors, and librarians. We wish to share our research data and experiences with biology students from three different perspectives: undergraduate and graduate education and the link with information literacy. We will show discuss strategies of implementation, assessment, and related skill development to bring this important skill into every curriculum as an essential component of academic scholarship and information literacy.

Elements of Engagement

Before the presentation, we will conduct an anonymous poll on OWL to assess needs of instructors and their students in the areas of annotated bibliographies, information literacy, and other related behaviours. During the presentation, clickers will provide instant feedback from the audience. From these data, we can focus on relevant issues and questions. With knowledge of interests before the session, we can bring in clicker questions more effectively to generate discussion points.

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Jul 10th, 10:45 AM

Annotation Innovation

P&A Rm 34

The skill of annotating sources is undervalued and undersubscribed in higher education despite the large volume of literature extolling its virtues. Instructors who have brought annotations into the curriculum have reported a dramatic drop in plagiarism rates, higher quality of sources, and more effective research strategies (Flaspohler et al. 2007). If annotations and writing are rarely incorporated into undergraduate programs, and students enter undergraduate science programs with little practice in reading, comprehension, and writing, then where does this leave our students when they enter graduate school? We have solutions that can be implemented at any level, to any degree of complexity, and to the benefit of students, instructors, and librarians. We wish to share our research data and experiences with biology students from three different perspectives: undergraduate and graduate education and the link with information literacy. We will show discuss strategies of implementation, assessment, and related skill development to bring this important skill into every curriculum as an essential component of academic scholarship and information literacy.