Proposal Title

The Communication of Science as an Integral Component to the Undergraduate Experience

Session Type

Workshop

Start Date

6-7-2011 10:15 AM

Keywords

science, communication, exercises, framing

Primary Threads

Teaching and Learning Science

Abstract

Communication is fundamental at all levels of scientific endeavors, not least of which is when scientists must talk about their field to the general public. While this should be considered part of a scientist's responsibility in general (in order to justify and promote public funding of science, influence policymaking decisions and create informed citizens in matters of science), it is particularly important to the alumni of our undergraduate Biology programs. Despite the fact that the majority of our Biology undergraduate students do not pursue Graduate studies after finishing their degrees, traditional undergraduate programs in Biology have not offered much training in the communication of science to non-scientist audiences. This is contrary to our need to impart our BSc alumni with the necessary skills to be effective ambassadors of science in their future jobs in government, business or teaching. In this workshop, participants will be given opportunities to practice communicating to a diversity of audiences using exercises on framing your topic, improvisation and media relations. We will also discuss the various means by which you may integrate these notions into the undergraduate curriculum.

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Jul 6th, 10:15 AM

The Communication of Science as an Integral Component to the Undergraduate Experience

Communication is fundamental at all levels of scientific endeavors, not least of which is when scientists must talk about their field to the general public. While this should be considered part of a scientist's responsibility in general (in order to justify and promote public funding of science, influence policymaking decisions and create informed citizens in matters of science), it is particularly important to the alumni of our undergraduate Biology programs. Despite the fact that the majority of our Biology undergraduate students do not pursue Graduate studies after finishing their degrees, traditional undergraduate programs in Biology have not offered much training in the communication of science to non-scientist audiences. This is contrary to our need to impart our BSc alumni with the necessary skills to be effective ambassadors of science in their future jobs in government, business or teaching. In this workshop, participants will be given opportunities to practice communicating to a diversity of audiences using exercises on framing your topic, improvisation and media relations. We will also discuss the various means by which you may integrate these notions into the undergraduate curriculum.