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Abstract

The Bahá’í are members of an independent monotheistic religion that originated in the 19th century. The Bahá’í faith constitutes the largest religious minority in Iran. Since the revolution of 1979, the Iranian government has sought to systematically deprive the Bahá’í community of their right to post-secondary education through various administrative practices. These actions are part of a larger persecution scheme that has resulted in more than 200 executions and numerous imprisonments since the 1979 revolution. This paper explores the nature of a number of human rights laws that bind Iran to recognize the right of its citizens to education. After providing a cursory glimpse of the problems faced by the Bahá’í students in Iran, the article discusses and evaluates the reaction of a number of United Nations bodies to these violations.