Physiology and Pharmacology Publications

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

7-5-2017

Journal

Journal of applied toxicology : JAT

URL with Digital Object Identifier

10.1002/jat.3502

Abstract

Up to 10% of women take selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) during pregnancy. Children exposed to SSRIs in utero have an increased risk of being overweight suggesting that fetal exposure to SSRIs can cause permanent metabolic changes. We have previously shown in rats that fetal and neonatal exposure to the SSRI antidepressant fluoxetine results in metabolic perturbations including increased hepatic triglyceride content; a hallmark of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the mechanism(s) underlying the fluoxetine-induced increase in intrahepatic triglyceride content. Female nulliparous Wistar rats were given vehicle or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day) orally for 2 weeks prior to mating until weaning. At 6 months of age, we assessed whether SSRI exposure altered components of the hepatic triglyceride biosynthesis pathway in the offspring and examined the molecular mechanisms underlying these changes. Male SSRI-exposed offspring had a significant increase in the steady-state mRNA levels of Elovl6 and Dgat1 and core components of the NLRP3 inflammasome (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation recruitment domain [ASC] and caspase-1). Augmented expression of Asc in the SSRI-exposed offspring coincided with increased histone acetylation in the proximal promoter region. Given that we have previously demonstrated that antenatal exposure to SSRIs can lead to fatty liver in the offspring, this raises concerns regarding the long-term metabolic sequelae of fetal SSRI exposure. Moreover, this study suggests that elevated hepatic triglyceride levels observed in the SSRI-exposed offspring may be due, in part, to activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and augmentation of de novo lipogenesis.


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