Start Date

2-3-2013 11:00 AM

End Date

2-3-2013 11:20 AM

Description

This paper uses Homi Bhabha’s theory of colonial mimicry to analyze Pieter-Dirk Uys’s MacBeki: A Farce to be Reckoned With. In doing so I posit MacBeki is a colonial mimic, a character who comically imitates European gestures and language. MacBeki’s behaviour throughout the play highlights the dangers of greed and corruption in post-apartheid South Africa and encourages the play’s audience to respond with ridiculing laughter. My paper concludes by arguing that Uys’s play should be read as a hybrid text that draws on European dramatic styles and South African political events, staging a critical response to national uncertainties ahead of the 2009 South African elections.

Comments

If needed, I can remove the "Political and Economic Context" portion of this article to decrease its size. I felt it was useful in understanding the situation in which Uys's play is operating and have thus left it in, unless otherwise recommended.

Also, thank you for all of your help and guidance. This is a great idea and I appreciate you taking the time to organize submissions.

 
Mar 2nd, 11:00 AM Mar 2nd, 11:20 AM

Class Movements in the New South Africa: Post-Colonial Politics, Neocolonialism, and Mimicry in Pieter-Dirk Uys’s MacBeki A Farce to be Reckoned With

This paper uses Homi Bhabha’s theory of colonial mimicry to analyze Pieter-Dirk Uys’s MacBeki: A Farce to be Reckoned With. In doing so I posit MacBeki is a colonial mimic, a character who comically imitates European gestures and language. MacBeki’s behaviour throughout the play highlights the dangers of greed and corruption in post-apartheid South Africa and encourages the play’s audience to respond with ridiculing laughter. My paper concludes by arguing that Uys’s play should be read as a hybrid text that draws on European dramatic styles and South African political events, staging a critical response to national uncertainties ahead of the 2009 South African elections.