Event Title

Exploring Elements of Identity in Music Education

Start Date

31-5-2011 11:30 AM

End Date

31-5-2011 12:30 PM

Description

Identity is complex and may include influences of race or ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, age, and/or physical or mental ability. In addition, various aspects of personal identity are more prominent and recognized within different music education settings. Yet, as one researcher notes, "currently, schools are being asked to transform themselves into caring communities of learning, and teachers are being invited to assume the role of community builder. Although the idea of creating learning communities carries popular appeal, little attention has been devoted to helping teachers to change their classrooms into personalized, caring learning environments" (Irvine, 2004, p.75). In building personalized, caring music learning environments, music educators must begin to acknowledge the variety of aspects that comprise the identities of their students as well as within themselves. Tatum's (1997) categories of "otherness" (race or ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, age, and/or physical or mental ability) provide music educators a framework on which to build an understanding of identity. Through understandings of “otherness” and acknowledgement of personal beliefs, music educators may develop sensitivity to individuals’ differences, allowing teachers and students to communicate and work more effectively in the music classroom. Ultimately, this may lead to more rewarding music experiences for both teachers and students. The proposed workshop will engage participants in small and large group activities that will probe issues of identity in music education. Through critical questioning, writing, reflection, and synthesis, participants will develop an understanding of personal identity and learn strategies for addressing these issues in the context of their own teaching. Part one of the workshop will establish a context and rationale for the importance of identity and its relationship to music education. Part two will allow participants to explore their own personal identity and beliefs through discussion based on Tatum’s categories of “otherness” as well as case studies dealing with issues of identity and diversity in music settings. The workshop will conclude with a summary of the emergent discussion and provide resources for further examination of identity in music education.

Comments

This was a workshop.

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May 31st, 11:30 AM May 31st, 12:30 PM

Exploring Elements of Identity in Music Education

Identity is complex and may include influences of race or ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, age, and/or physical or mental ability. In addition, various aspects of personal identity are more prominent and recognized within different music education settings. Yet, as one researcher notes, "currently, schools are being asked to transform themselves into caring communities of learning, and teachers are being invited to assume the role of community builder. Although the idea of creating learning communities carries popular appeal, little attention has been devoted to helping teachers to change their classrooms into personalized, caring learning environments" (Irvine, 2004, p.75). In building personalized, caring music learning environments, music educators must begin to acknowledge the variety of aspects that comprise the identities of their students as well as within themselves. Tatum's (1997) categories of "otherness" (race or ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, age, and/or physical or mental ability) provide music educators a framework on which to build an understanding of identity. Through understandings of “otherness” and acknowledgement of personal beliefs, music educators may develop sensitivity to individuals’ differences, allowing teachers and students to communicate and work more effectively in the music classroom. Ultimately, this may lead to more rewarding music experiences for both teachers and students. The proposed workshop will engage participants in small and large group activities that will probe issues of identity in music education. Through critical questioning, writing, reflection, and synthesis, participants will develop an understanding of personal identity and learn strategies for addressing these issues in the context of their own teaching. Part one of the workshop will establish a context and rationale for the importance of identity and its relationship to music education. Part two will allow participants to explore their own personal identity and beliefs through discussion based on Tatum’s categories of “otherness” as well as case studies dealing with issues of identity and diversity in music settings. The workshop will conclude with a summary of the emergent discussion and provide resources for further examination of identity in music education.