Event Title

50 Years: The Stockholm Institute of Music

Start Date

30-5-2011 10:30 AM

End Date

30-5-2011 12:30 PM

Description

Seven people met in Stockholm in the autumn of 1960 to found a private institute for music teacher education destined to become an alternative to the established public conservatories. This was a clear reaction against the hegemony of traditional teaching practices, offering a distinct approach based on close ties to educational practice, group tuition and singing in all courses. There was at the time a general lack of qualified music teachers in Sweden – only one half of the music teachers (50%) in the compulsory school were formally educated, and only one quarter (25%) among instrumental pedagogues. There were therefore both qualitative and quantitative arguments to support the expansion of formal music teacher education. Our review is based on archives from board meetings, annual reports, various registers and commemorative works during the fifty years this University College has been in existence. SMI's legislative history helps clarify the music educational modernization occurring during the second half of the 20th century. Modernization emphasized the rationalism behind one-to-one teaching while SMI promoted a group-teaching methodology. This was perceived as better tailored to meet pedagogical needs and the childrens' desires to develop their practice together with their peers. With regard to the current discourse on practical knowledge, SMI is of particular interest. Students at SMI work as music teachers parallel to their studies. The balance between theory and practice is still a unique and compelling reason for students to choose studying at SMI. Apart from being able to address current issues in teaching practice from direct experience, the degree design promotes the possibility to continue living and working in the home community and to combine study and income-generating employment. SMI has undergone an institutional metamorphosis from the first decades forming a study centre for adult education, evolving through a college identity to become an established university college with accredited music education degree programs. SMI has played an important role as an alternative and example in the areas of practice-oriented and distance education. Despite SMI's marginal institutional position, small-scale organisation and meagre economic resources, it was at the turn of the 1980's the single largest producer of instrumental and vocal teachers in Sweden. It has currently an increase in students auditioning to attend the music teacher programme, from 60 applicants 2009, to 106 applicants in 2010, an increase of nearly 80 per cent.

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May 30th, 10:30 AM May 30th, 12:30 PM

50 Years: The Stockholm Institute of Music

Seven people met in Stockholm in the autumn of 1960 to found a private institute for music teacher education destined to become an alternative to the established public conservatories. This was a clear reaction against the hegemony of traditional teaching practices, offering a distinct approach based on close ties to educational practice, group tuition and singing in all courses. There was at the time a general lack of qualified music teachers in Sweden – only one half of the music teachers (50%) in the compulsory school were formally educated, and only one quarter (25%) among instrumental pedagogues. There were therefore both qualitative and quantitative arguments to support the expansion of formal music teacher education. Our review is based on archives from board meetings, annual reports, various registers and commemorative works during the fifty years this University College has been in existence. SMI's legislative history helps clarify the music educational modernization occurring during the second half of the 20th century. Modernization emphasized the rationalism behind one-to-one teaching while SMI promoted a group-teaching methodology. This was perceived as better tailored to meet pedagogical needs and the childrens' desires to develop their practice together with their peers. With regard to the current discourse on practical knowledge, SMI is of particular interest. Students at SMI work as music teachers parallel to their studies. The balance between theory and practice is still a unique and compelling reason for students to choose studying at SMI. Apart from being able to address current issues in teaching practice from direct experience, the degree design promotes the possibility to continue living and working in the home community and to combine study and income-generating employment. SMI has undergone an institutional metamorphosis from the first decades forming a study centre for adult education, evolving through a college identity to become an established university college with accredited music education degree programs. SMI has played an important role as an alternative and example in the areas of practice-oriented and distance education. Despite SMI's marginal institutional position, small-scale organisation and meagre economic resources, it was at the turn of the 1980's the single largest producer of instrumental and vocal teachers in Sweden. It has currently an increase in students auditioning to attend the music teacher programme, from 60 applicants 2009, to 106 applicants in 2010, an increase of nearly 80 per cent.