Start Date

30-5-2011 2:30 PM

End Date

30-5-2011 3:00 PM

Description

Paul Maxwell is very careful to praise his formal music education in classical theory, piano, and musicology. As a business major, he minored in music at Wilfrid Laurier University and studied music all through his elementary and secondary school years. His dream for a community music centre that featured live performances and instruction was forged in his fourth year of undergraduate study. At the age of 26, Paul Maxwell is into his third year of operation. This paper explores the relationship that is being forged between a community music-for-profit enterprise and a very traditional university faculty of music. At first, common ground is not abundantly evident. Yet, an interesting symbiosis between the Laurier’s Centre for Music in the Community and this spunky little neighbour across the street is emerging. Various aspects of the co-existence and growing mutual recognition of each other are described. Models of future collaborations are developed and a general response from the community at large about the effects of Maxwell’s Music house are reported. We pose the following questions and seek for some initial answers in relation to this investigation: How do we equip our music graduates with the skills and entrepreneurship for a career in teaching in and through music in our modern communities? Who teaches? Who studies? Whose and what music is taught? What models of music education can we find in our community and how do they inform our traditional (school) models of teaching and learning? What is the role of the academy in advancing the musical life of the community?


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May 30th, 2:30 PM May 30th, 3:00 PM

Maxwell's Music House and Wilfrid Laurier University's Faculty of Music: A Study in Contrasting Commonality

Paul Maxwell is very careful to praise his formal music education in classical theory, piano, and musicology. As a business major, he minored in music at Wilfrid Laurier University and studied music all through his elementary and secondary school years. His dream for a community music centre that featured live performances and instruction was forged in his fourth year of undergraduate study. At the age of 26, Paul Maxwell is into his third year of operation. This paper explores the relationship that is being forged between a community music-for-profit enterprise and a very traditional university faculty of music. At first, common ground is not abundantly evident. Yet, an interesting symbiosis between the Laurier’s Centre for Music in the Community and this spunky little neighbour across the street is emerging. Various aspects of the co-existence and growing mutual recognition of each other are described. Models of future collaborations are developed and a general response from the community at large about the effects of Maxwell’s Music house are reported. We pose the following questions and seek for some initial answers in relation to this investigation: How do we equip our music graduates with the skills and entrepreneurship for a career in teaching in and through music in our modern communities? Who teaches? Who studies? Whose and what music is taught? What models of music education can we find in our community and how do they inform our traditional (school) models of teaching and learning? What is the role of the academy in advancing the musical life of the community?