Taking a non-hierarchical perspective of decolonial projects, this paper considers Walter D. Mignolo's concept of "dignity" and Peter Kulchyski's notion of "Aboriginal rights" in an attempt to explore the space existing between a hegemonic paradigm of universal human rights and Indigenous struggles against oppression. It seeks to locate the place of colonial difference in the authors’ respective notions by emphasizing the role of local histories, knowledge, and struggles. An acknowledgment of the limitations inherent in exploring these notions from a privileged location in the colonial matrix of power, a discussion of the intersection of Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in their struggles against the colonial matrix of power, and a consideration of Mignolo's "universal project of diversality" conclude with discourse on the term "sovereignty" in light of its roles both within and against the colonial matrix of power.

CLAIRE WINDSOR is in her final year of a double major in Global Development and Political Science at Huron. After taking time for work and travel she expects to attend graduate school, furthering her research into the application of critical and feminist theory to the spheres of Indigeneity, human rights and conflict.