Abstract

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada calls upon those who can effect change within Canadian systems to recognize the value of Indigenous healing practices and to collaborate with Indigenous healers, Elders, and knowledge keepers where requested by Indigenous Peoples. This article presents the Indigenous Cultural Responsiveness Theory (ICRT) as a decolonized pathway designed to guide research that continuously improves the health, education, governance, and policies of Indigenous Peoples in Saskatchewan. Decolonizing practices include privileging and engaging in Indigenous philosophies, beliefs, practices, and values that counter colonialism and restore well-being. The ICRT supports the development of collaborative relationships between Indigenous Peoples and non-Indigenous allies who seek to improve the status of First Nations health and wellness.

Acknowledgments

Peter Nippi – Kinistin First Nation Murray Ironchild – Piapot First Nation Sam Isaac – Ochapowace First Nation Lorraine Yuzicappi – Standing Buffalo First Nation Rose Atimoyoo – Little Pine First Nation Lambert Sylvestre – Turner Lake First Nation Dorothy Myo – Saskatchewan Indian Cultural Centre Willie Ermine – Sturgeon Lake First Nation Ben Weenie – Sweet Grass First Nation Janice Kennedy – Battlefords Tribal Council Flora Fiddler – Meadow Lake Tribal Council Angie Tanner – Cowessess First Nation Val Arnault-Pelletier – University of Saskatchewan – College of Medicine Joyce Racette – Regina Qu’Appelle Regional Health Authority Gabe Lafond – Saskatoon Health Regional Health Authority Patricia Neufeld – Prince Albert Parkland Regional Health Authority Noel Starblanket - University of Regina Alma Poitras - University of Regina

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.