Geography Publications

Title

The Geopolitics of Identity: Popular Literature, Censorship, and the Spanish Media

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-2002

Journal

Identity: An International Journal of Theory and Research

Volume

2

Issue

2

First Page

177

Last Page

193

URL with Digital Object Identifier

http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/S1532706XID0202_05

Abstract

National identity and manufactured unity have paved the way to the modern phenomenon of the nation-state, which emerged around the French Revolution in the late 18th century. The nation-state sought to unite the people by means of homogenization, creating a "common culture, symbols, values, reviving traditions and myths of origin, and sometimes inventing them" (Guibernau, 2000, p. 989). Ethnic division had no place or explanation in this product of the Enlightenment. Yet, despite the high minded aim of nation builders, ethnic and cultural differences did not disappear over-night. Indeed, they have been noted and written about by reporters and political observers alike. Their vision of these differences challenges the status quo in many ways, and most likely has altered the manner in which national unity is perceived in-side and outside national borders.