Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2014

Journal

Canadian Journal of Higher Education

Volume

44

Issue

2

First Page

85

Last Page

104

Abstract

Interdisciplinarity is a pervasive trend in 21st-century knowledge building and innovation. It is predicated on the recognition that creative solutions to the world’s increasingly complex problems require the intersection of diverse expertise. Little scholarly attention has been directed towards how the new interdisciplinary (ID) model is in uencing the processes and outcomes of graduate research training. In a qualitative study informed by critical narra- tive analysis and conducted at one institution, we investigate the epistemo- logical, structural, and relational factors that shape ID doctoral research supervision, explore how di ering knowledge cultures and values are negoti- ated in supervisory practices, and consider how established structures and discourses in uence the processes and outcomes of these supervisory rela- tionships.


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