University of Western Ontario - Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Location of Thesis Examination

Room 5406 Social Science Centre

Degree

Master of Arts

Program

Sociology

Supervisor

Dr. Tracey Adams

Abstract

In recent years the medical profession has become feminized. Additionally, there has been an increased representation of foreign-trained professionals in the Canadian medical profession; many of which are women. Thus, there is a significant number of female medical practitioners who are foreign-born and foreign-trained. This demographic faces many barriers, which are often characterized as a “double disadvantage”. This paper investigates the experiences of foreign-trained medical professionals once they have gained access to the profession and whether the feminization of medicine has impacted the experiences of these individuals. Immigrant status was found to be highly significant to one’s experiences in the profession. Additionally, gender, period, and country of origin were significant. It was found that the feminization of the profession did impact the experiences of the respondents to some extent. The experiences of foreign-trained medical professionals are complex and dependent on a number of different variables.