Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Degree

Master of Science

Program

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Supervisor

Dr. Piotr Wilk

Abstract

Background: Food insecurity in Canada’s Indigenous population continues to be an urgent public health issue, as prevalence is much higher for Indigenous Canadians than non-Indigenous Canadians.

Objective: To examine the associations between social determinants of health, Indigenous-specific factors and food insecurity among off-reserve Indigenous adults aged 20 and older in Canada.

Methods: Data from the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey were used in this analysis. A hierarchical logistic regression model was run to examine relationships between social determinants of health, Indigenous-specific factors and food insecurity.

Results: Younger age, Inuit identity, low income, educational attainment less than high school, lack of employment, household crowding, lone-parent households and having family members who attended residential schools were major risk factors for household food insecurity.

Conclusion: Food insecurity policies and initiatives should focus on the most vulnerable groups within the Indigenous population. Future research should address limitations of the current household food security measure.


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