Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Degree

Master of Arts

Program

Education

Supervisor(s)

Dr. Claire Crooks

Abstract

The current study examined the relationships among teen dating violence, mental health problems and mental well-being in 338 adolescents aged 14-21 (54% female). Secondary data were retrieved from an evaluation of a small groups healthy relationship program. Participants were grouped into four different dating violence profiles based on self-reported perpetration and victimization: not involved, perpetrators, victims and combined. Generalized Linear Models were used to examine the similarities and differences across types on depression, anxiety, mental well-being and binge drinking. Results suggested that the victims and combined profiles experienced greater mental health problems and decreased mental well-being compared to other profiles. Victims who reported binge drinking had decreased symptoms of depression, in comparison to members of all other profiles. Findings underscore the need to look holistically at challenges facing youth when developing health promotion or prevention programs; that is, finding ways to promote healthy relationships and positive mental health, while preventing relationship violence and substance abuse.