Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Degree

Master of Science

Program

Nursing

Supervisor(s)

Dr. Carol A. Wong

Abstract

The prevalence of burnout among nurses is linked to sub-optimal wellbeing and is reflected in higher than average rates of illness and absenteeism (Canadian Institute for Health Information, [CIHI], 2007). Additionally, there are consequences for clients including increased staff related errors and poor patient satisfaction. An improved person-job match in the six areas of worklife and higher compassion satisfaction may result in a workforce that is more engaged and able to achieve positive client outcomes. This study explores the relationship between person-job match and both compassion satisfaction and the emotional exhaustion component of burnout of mental health nurses through a secondary analysis of data previously collected as part of a larger study of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue and burnout among mental health staff. Findings indicated that compassion satisfaction partially mediates the relationship between person-job match and the emotional exhaustion component of burnout. Further, overall person-job match and compassion satisfaction explained 43% of the variance in emotional exhaustion (F(2, 65) = 25.092, p = 0.005, R2 = 0.430). Findings suggest that improved person-job match and compassion satisfaction would be beneficial in reducing burnout among mental health nurses.


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