Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Degree

Master of Science

Program

Nursing

Supervisor

Dr. Michael Kerr

Abstract

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this secondary data analysis study was to examine nurses’ perceptions about inter-professional collaboration (IPC), job satisfaction and patient safety climate and the possible relationship between them in a large tertiary care hospital in Ontario, Canada. The data used for this study came from a large quasi-experimental study to evaluate the impact of introducing a new model of IPC. D’Amour’s Inter-professional Collaboration, Hackman & Oldham’s Global Job Satisfaction, and Sexton’s Patient Safety Climate were the main instruments used in this study. Study results showed that nurses reported moderate levels of IPC (M= 3.56, SD= .65) as measured by two inter-professional subscales including: care coordination (M= 3.46, SD= .74) and sharing clinical activity (M= 3.63, SD= .66), moderate levels of job satisfaction (M= 3.28, SD= .97), and lastly, nurses reported moderately high perceptions of patient safety climate (M= 75.59, SD= 16.96). Multiple linear regression showed that inter-professional collaboration and nurses’ job satisfaction explained a significant amount of the variance in patient safety climate [R2 = .33, F (7, 740) = 52,15, p < .05]. This is may be the first study to report nurses’ perceptions about job satisfaction partially mediates the relationships between inter-professional collaboration and patient safety climate.


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