Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Degree

Master of Health Information Science

Program

Health Information Science

Supervisor

Dr. Nadine Wathen

Abstract

Abstract

Neuroscience has seen explosive growth in research and public interest, but research findings are often reported inaccurately, impacting public understanding. Exploratory descriptive case study methods were used to analyze two peer reviewed research articles, one on brain imaging for patients in a Persistent Vegetative State (PVS), and another on Brain Training (BT), and all journalism stories regarding these two studies. Statistical and content analyses were used to analyze the accuracy of the translation of the research into journalism stories. PVS research received more media attention and this reporting was less accurate than for BT research; the information was also discussed and presented in different ways, including broad implications and generalizations in the PVS, but not the BT, stories. The difference in level of media saturation and accuracy between PVS and BT research is likely because the PVS stories often linked the social/ethical issues of life and death to the research.


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