Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Degree

Master of Science

Program

Psychology

Supervisor

Mitch Rothstein

Abstract

This study sought to provide support for the King-Rothstein (2010) model of resiliency and to establish an understanding of the relationship between resiliency and causal attributions. A cross-sectional study investigated these relationships using an online questionnaire battery. Some associative and predictive relationships were found between causal attributions and resiliency. Components of resiliency were predictive of job satisfaction and support and symptoms of psychological illness. Given a path analysis, the King-Rothstein model of resiliency was found to be most predictive of the outcome symptoms of psychological illness (over job satisfaction and support or wellbeing). Finally, mediation analysis revealed self-regulatory processes fully mediated the relationship between causal attributions and symptoms of psychological illness. Given the results obtained through the completion of this thesis it is believed that the constructs of causal attributions and resiliency are independent although mildly associated constructs. The impact of these findings with regards to future research are discussed.

Resubmission.pdf (3408 kB)
PDF Version of Thesis Until Pg Break 1

Resubmission.2.pdf (95 kB)
PDF Version of Thesis Until Pg Break 2

Resubmission.3.pdf (490 kB)
PDF Version of Thesis Until Pg Break 3


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