Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

The Ontario Endangered Species Act (ESA 2007) provides protection of listed bat species and their habitat, including Eastern Small-footed Myotis (Myotis leibii), Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), and Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis); all of which have been identified as Endangered. The Tri-coloured Bat (Perimyotis subflavus) is currently under review and may be identified at risk in the near future. Bats are listed as a result of the spread of White-nose Syndrome (WNS), a fungal pathogen that has resulted in mass mortality events within hibernation sites. Through the use of two case studies we identify a number of challenges in accounting for bat species at risk during development, including identification and confirmation of natural maternity roost habitat. In our experience, woodlands have been considered general habitat regardless of confirmation of use if bat species at risk are recorded in the Project Area. This has implications for development projects that propose to remove any treed habitat, however; there are some general mitigation measures that, in most cases, can be implemented to avoid impacts. This includes timing restrictions for tree clearing, habitat restoration and compensation, and retention of suitable roost trees. Failure to consider protected habitat for Endangered bats early in the planning process could have consequences for project schedules. It is recommended that development projects proposing tree removal identify potential bat habitat features early in the planning process and engage in early and ongoing consultation with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF).


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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

TRA-913: BAT SPECIES AT RISK AND IMPLICATIONS TO INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS IN ONTARIO

London

The Ontario Endangered Species Act (ESA 2007) provides protection of listed bat species and their habitat, including Eastern Small-footed Myotis (Myotis leibii), Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus), and Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis); all of which have been identified as Endangered. The Tri-coloured Bat (Perimyotis subflavus) is currently under review and may be identified at risk in the near future. Bats are listed as a result of the spread of White-nose Syndrome (WNS), a fungal pathogen that has resulted in mass mortality events within hibernation sites. Through the use of two case studies we identify a number of challenges in accounting for bat species at risk during development, including identification and confirmation of natural maternity roost habitat. In our experience, woodlands have been considered general habitat regardless of confirmation of use if bat species at risk are recorded in the Project Area. This has implications for development projects that propose to remove any treed habitat, however; there are some general mitigation measures that, in most cases, can be implemented to avoid impacts. This includes timing restrictions for tree clearing, habitat restoration and compensation, and retention of suitable roost trees. Failure to consider protected habitat for Endangered bats early in the planning process could have consequences for project schedules. It is recommended that development projects proposing tree removal identify potential bat habitat features early in the planning process and engage in early and ongoing consultation with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF).

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/Transportation/6