Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

Foam glass lightweight aggregate (LWA) derived from mixed waste and recycled glass has great potential for use as an alternative material for several applications in building and other industrial applications. Despite the significant superior features of the current product, there is still room for further research to improve the structural performance of newly developed foam glass and foam glass-ceramics produced from waste and recycled materials. Improvements may be achieved through controlling microstructures and the distributions of pore sizes and shapes, altering chemical and phase compositions, creating reinforced structures by the inclusion of other fibrous materials as well as adding colour to the foam glass and glass-ceramics. One commercially used foam glass gravel has been selected and was the subject of a wide range of tests to determine its physical and mechanical properties and to compare them to conventional products in the industry. Results obtained from percent crushed particle content, abrasion resistance and freezing and thawing resistance testing are presented and analysed. Methods for improving foam properties and expanding its usefulness in engineering applications are proposed; adjusting the microstructure characteristics and changing the chemical and phase composition were found to be effective. A deeper examination of the microstructure by microscopy (SEM or TEM) further revealed the promising features of the evaluated material as a new versatile construction material. In addition, inclusion of colouring oxides in foam formulation was examined as an innovative way for increasing mechanical strength in a colourful product.


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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

TRA-961: FOAM GLASS LIGHTWEIGHT AGGREGATE: THE NEW APPROACH

London

Foam glass lightweight aggregate (LWA) derived from mixed waste and recycled glass has great potential for use as an alternative material for several applications in building and other industrial applications. Despite the significant superior features of the current product, there is still room for further research to improve the structural performance of newly developed foam glass and foam glass-ceramics produced from waste and recycled materials. Improvements may be achieved through controlling microstructures and the distributions of pore sizes and shapes, altering chemical and phase compositions, creating reinforced structures by the inclusion of other fibrous materials as well as adding colour to the foam glass and glass-ceramics. One commercially used foam glass gravel has been selected and was the subject of a wide range of tests to determine its physical and mechanical properties and to compare them to conventional products in the industry. Results obtained from percent crushed particle content, abrasion resistance and freezing and thawing resistance testing are presented and analysed. Methods for improving foam properties and expanding its usefulness in engineering applications are proposed; adjusting the microstructure characteristics and changing the chemical and phase composition were found to be effective. A deeper examination of the microstructure by microscopy (SEM or TEM) further revealed the promising features of the evaluated material as a new versatile construction material. In addition, inclusion of colouring oxides in foam formulation was examined as an innovative way for increasing mechanical strength in a colourful product.

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/Transportation/35