Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

Modular bridge systems consisting of precast concrete deck panels connected to steel girders are becoming increasingly popular due to their rapid construction and optimal material utilization. The shear connection is a critical element of the system, having significant impacts on construction time, economic and environmental cost, structural integrity, and durability. Today welded shear studs are by far the most common type of shear connection. In steel-precast composite bridges, the studs are commonly grouped together so that the precast deck panels can be affixed to the girders by providing full depth “shear pockets” filled with grout. A laboratory beam testing program is underway at the University of Waterloo to investigate the effect of cyclic loading on stud shear connectors in cast-in-place and precast bridge girders. The program consists of twelve beam specimens, uniquely tested using a variable amplitude load history simulating Canadian highway truck traffic. In addition to yielding valuable S-N (stress plotted vs. the number of cycles until fatigue failure) data, initial test results provide evidence of the benefits of redundancy in the structural system and the value of beam tests over push-out tests. Calculating connector stresses in a composite beam is made complicated by interfacial slip and neutral axis migration. The end goal of this research is to provide Canadian bridge designers and erectors with improved design and construction recommendations in order to improve the efficiency and economy of this structural system for rapid bridge replacement projects.


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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

STR-923: FATIGUE OF STUD SHEAR CONNECTORS IN STEEL-PRECAST COMPOSITE BRIDGES

London

Modular bridge systems consisting of precast concrete deck panels connected to steel girders are becoming increasingly popular due to their rapid construction and optimal material utilization. The shear connection is a critical element of the system, having significant impacts on construction time, economic and environmental cost, structural integrity, and durability. Today welded shear studs are by far the most common type of shear connection. In steel-precast composite bridges, the studs are commonly grouped together so that the precast deck panels can be affixed to the girders by providing full depth “shear pockets” filled with grout. A laboratory beam testing program is underway at the University of Waterloo to investigate the effect of cyclic loading on stud shear connectors in cast-in-place and precast bridge girders. The program consists of twelve beam specimens, uniquely tested using a variable amplitude load history simulating Canadian highway truck traffic. In addition to yielding valuable S-N (stress plotted vs. the number of cycles until fatigue failure) data, initial test results provide evidence of the benefits of redundancy in the structural system and the value of beam tests over push-out tests. Calculating connector stresses in a composite beam is made complicated by interfacial slip and neutral axis migration. The end goal of this research is to provide Canadian bridge designers and erectors with improved design and construction recommendations in order to improve the efficiency and economy of this structural system for rapid bridge replacement projects.

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/Structural/72