Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

This study aimed to investigate the effect of crumb rubber (CR) on the flexural behavior and cracking characteristics of self-consolidating concrete beams. Four full-scale self-consolidating rubberized concrete (SCRC) beams containing recycled CR particles as a partial replacement for fine aggregate with percentage ranging from 0% to 15% (by volume of sand) were tested. The performance of some design codes was evaluated in predicting the cracking moment and crack widths of the tested beams. The results indicated that increasing the CR content noticeably reduced the compressive strength, tensile strength, and first cracking moment of all SCRC beams. However, up to 15% replacement of CR, the flexural capacity of the tested beams was shown to be slightly decreased. In addition, increasing the CR content appeared to improve the beams’ ductility and limit the flexural crack widths. In general, the results of flexural loading tests indicated a promising potential for using SCRC in structural applications.


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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

STR-867: FLEXURAL BEHAVIOUR OF REINFORCED SCC BEAMS CONTAINING RECYCLED CRUMB RUBBER

London

This study aimed to investigate the effect of crumb rubber (CR) on the flexural behavior and cracking characteristics of self-consolidating concrete beams. Four full-scale self-consolidating rubberized concrete (SCRC) beams containing recycled CR particles as a partial replacement for fine aggregate with percentage ranging from 0% to 15% (by volume of sand) were tested. The performance of some design codes was evaluated in predicting the cracking moment and crack widths of the tested beams. The results indicated that increasing the CR content noticeably reduced the compressive strength, tensile strength, and first cracking moment of all SCRC beams. However, up to 15% replacement of CR, the flexural capacity of the tested beams was shown to be slightly decreased. In addition, increasing the CR content appeared to improve the beams’ ductility and limit the flexural crack widths. In general, the results of flexural loading tests indicated a promising potential for using SCRC in structural applications.

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/Structural/42