Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

This paper investigates the feasibility of applying acoustic emission (AE) monitoring to evaluate the cover cracking caused by reinforcing steel corrosion in concrete structures. Ten small-scale reinforced concrete prism samples were continuously monitored using attached AE sensors as being exposed to accelerated corrosion tests. The samples had a constant concrete cover (40 mm) around one embedded steel bar and were corroded to reach five percentages of steel mass loss: 1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, and 5%. Several AE signal parameters including number of hits, signal strength, energy, amplitude, and peak frequency were acquired during the tests. The AE signal strength data were also incorporated in an intensity analysis to attain two additional AE parameters namely; historic index (H (t)) and severity (Sr). For the comparison, visual inspection of all samples was performed to detect and measure cover crack widths. The results indicated that AE parameters especially H (t) and Sr were in a good correlation with the corresponding values of crack widths at all percentages of steel mass loss. In addition, a damage classification chart was generated using the values of H (t) and Sr to predict the cover crack width associated with reinforcement corrosion in concrete structures.


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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

STR-844: COVER CRACK GROWTH MONITORING IN RC STRUCTURES SUBJECTED TO CORROSION WITH ACOUSTIC EMISSION SENSORS

London

This paper investigates the feasibility of applying acoustic emission (AE) monitoring to evaluate the cover cracking caused by reinforcing steel corrosion in concrete structures. Ten small-scale reinforced concrete prism samples were continuously monitored using attached AE sensors as being exposed to accelerated corrosion tests. The samples had a constant concrete cover (40 mm) around one embedded steel bar and were corroded to reach five percentages of steel mass loss: 1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, and 5%. Several AE signal parameters including number of hits, signal strength, energy, amplitude, and peak frequency were acquired during the tests. The AE signal strength data were also incorporated in an intensity analysis to attain two additional AE parameters namely; historic index (H (t)) and severity (Sr). For the comparison, visual inspection of all samples was performed to detect and measure cover crack widths. The results indicated that AE parameters especially H (t) and Sr were in a good correlation with the corresponding values of crack widths at all percentages of steel mass loss. In addition, a damage classification chart was generated using the values of H (t) and Sr to predict the cover crack width associated with reinforcement corrosion in concrete structures.

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/Structural/28