Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

An experimental study was recently conducted to address the applicability of concrete shear walls entirely reinforced with glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars and subjected to quasi-static reversed cyclic lateral loading in attaining reasonable strength and drift requirements specified in different codes. The reported test results clearly show that properly designed and detailed GFRP-reinforced concrete (RC) walls could reach their flexural capacities with no strength degradation. The results also demonstrate that the tested walls were able to achieve recoverable and self-centering behavior up to allowable drift limits before experiencing moderate damage and attain a maximum drift comparable to steel-RC walls. The promising results provide impetus for constructing shear walls with GFRP bars and constitute a step toward using GFRP bars in lateral-resisting systems. Since enhancing concrete confinement at the boundary might be a solution in attempting to increase the deformation capacity of GFRP-RC shear walls without significant loss of strength, a series of shear walls were constructed with different reinforcement confinement configurations at the boundary zone. This paper compares the first tested shear wall to a previously reported shear wall (Mohamed et al 2014a). The results show a significant increase in lateral drift and strength of almost 79% and 27%, respectively, by doubling the confinement reinforcement ratio of the boundary. The seismic behavior of the wall was obviously improved, and the deformability level was significantly enhanced.


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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

STR-830: ENHANCING THE DEFORMATION CAPACITY OF CONCRETE SHEAR WALLS REINFORCED WITH GFRP BARS

London

An experimental study was recently conducted to address the applicability of concrete shear walls entirely reinforced with glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars and subjected to quasi-static reversed cyclic lateral loading in attaining reasonable strength and drift requirements specified in different codes. The reported test results clearly show that properly designed and detailed GFRP-reinforced concrete (RC) walls could reach their flexural capacities with no strength degradation. The results also demonstrate that the tested walls were able to achieve recoverable and self-centering behavior up to allowable drift limits before experiencing moderate damage and attain a maximum drift comparable to steel-RC walls. The promising results provide impetus for constructing shear walls with GFRP bars and constitute a step toward using GFRP bars in lateral-resisting systems. Since enhancing concrete confinement at the boundary might be a solution in attempting to increase the deformation capacity of GFRP-RC shear walls without significant loss of strength, a series of shear walls were constructed with different reinforcement confinement configurations at the boundary zone. This paper compares the first tested shear wall to a previously reported shear wall (Mohamed et al 2014a). The results show a significant increase in lateral drift and strength of almost 79% and 27%, respectively, by doubling the confinement reinforcement ratio of the boundary. The seismic behavior of the wall was obviously improved, and the deformability level was significantly enhanced.

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/Structural/18