Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

Steel-reinforced squat walls are used as the main component for earthquake resistance in low-rise structures. Deterioration due to corrosion of steel reinforcement is one of the major challenges facing the construction industry. Furthermore, given the low aspect ratio of squat walls, their behavior is dominated by inelastic shear deformations activated by the yielding of flexural reinforcement. These deformations degrade strength and stiffness with subsequent shear failure, preventing the wall from achieving its flexural capacity, which is a prerequisite for adequate seismic design. Using noncorrodible glass-fiber-reinforced-polymer (GFRP) bars represents an effective method for overcoming corrosion problems. In addition, the available experimental studies on mid-rise shear walls show that GFRP reinforcement can control shear deformation, which is a major problem with steel-reinforced squat walls. Our study was experimentally conducted to investigate the shear-deformation behavior of GFRP-reinforced squat walls. Two full-scale squat walls with an aspect ratio of 1.3 were constructed and tested to failure under quasi-static reversed cyclic lateral loading: one was reinforced with steel bars; the other with GFRP bars. The experimental results show that the GFRP-reinforced wall evidenced significantly enhanced behavior related to ultimate strength, drift ratio, control shear distortion, and mode of failure compared to the steel-reinforced wall.


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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

STR-829: BEHAVIOR OF GFRP-REINFORCED CONCRETE SQUAT WALLS UNDER SIMULATED EARTHQUAKE LOADING

London

Steel-reinforced squat walls are used as the main component for earthquake resistance in low-rise structures. Deterioration due to corrosion of steel reinforcement is one of the major challenges facing the construction industry. Furthermore, given the low aspect ratio of squat walls, their behavior is dominated by inelastic shear deformations activated by the yielding of flexural reinforcement. These deformations degrade strength and stiffness with subsequent shear failure, preventing the wall from achieving its flexural capacity, which is a prerequisite for adequate seismic design. Using noncorrodible glass-fiber-reinforced-polymer (GFRP) bars represents an effective method for overcoming corrosion problems. In addition, the available experimental studies on mid-rise shear walls show that GFRP reinforcement can control shear deformation, which is a major problem with steel-reinforced squat walls. Our study was experimentally conducted to investigate the shear-deformation behavior of GFRP-reinforced squat walls. Two full-scale squat walls with an aspect ratio of 1.3 were constructed and tested to failure under quasi-static reversed cyclic lateral loading: one was reinforced with steel bars; the other with GFRP bars. The experimental results show that the GFRP-reinforced wall evidenced significantly enhanced behavior related to ultimate strength, drift ratio, control shear distortion, and mode of failure compared to the steel-reinforced wall.

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/Structural/17