Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

Lack of reliable and adequate information on material characteristics of glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) at elevated temperatures lowers the accuracy of analytical and design models developed to predict the behaviour of GFRP reinforced concrete members. There is an essential need to assess the remaining strength of bridge and building components after exposure to fire to determine if repair or replacement is required. This paper presents experimental results of a series of tensile tests on GFRP reinforcing bars after exposure to elevated temperatures. GFRP specimens with nominal diameter of 16 mm were exposed to different temperatures in an electric furnace. During the heat exposure, the samples were loaded with 25 % of their ultimate tensile strength to simulate the sustained load that a reinforcing bar in a concrete member may carry in a fire incident. After the samples cooled to room temperature, they were loaded to failure. The same type of GFRP bars had been tested earlier by the authors under simultaneous effects of heat and load. At high temperature, the bars had considerable strength loss. However, the results presented in this paper show notable tensile strength recovery when the specimens were cooled before loading to failure. This information is essential for studying the post-fire evaluation of GFRP reinforced concrete members exposed to fires.


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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

STR-988: POST-FIRE RESIDUAL STRENGTH OF GLASS FIBRE REINFORCED POLYMER (GFRP) BARS

London

Lack of reliable and adequate information on material characteristics of glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) at elevated temperatures lowers the accuracy of analytical and design models developed to predict the behaviour of GFRP reinforced concrete members. There is an essential need to assess the remaining strength of bridge and building components after exposure to fire to determine if repair or replacement is required. This paper presents experimental results of a series of tensile tests on GFRP reinforcing bars after exposure to elevated temperatures. GFRP specimens with nominal diameter of 16 mm were exposed to different temperatures in an electric furnace. During the heat exposure, the samples were loaded with 25 % of their ultimate tensile strength to simulate the sustained load that a reinforcing bar in a concrete member may carry in a fire incident. After the samples cooled to room temperature, they were loaded to failure. The same type of GFRP bars had been tested earlier by the authors under simultaneous effects of heat and load. At high temperature, the bars had considerable strength loss. However, the results presented in this paper show notable tensile strength recovery when the specimens were cooled before loading to failure. This information is essential for studying the post-fire evaluation of GFRP reinforced concrete members exposed to fires.

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/Structural/110