Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

Vibration serviceability is often the governing design factor for slender, lightweight footbridges. However, there is currently a large gap that exists between our understanding from a modeling perspective and their actual vibration behaviour. Recent experimental tests conducted at the University of Waterloo have underscored these discrepancies and have provided an unique opportunity to not only validate many of the models currently in use, but also to propose new modifications to better align with experimental test results. Specifically, issues such as how to design for lateral vibrations and crowd-induced loading and calibration of load factors, will be addressed in this presentation. Recent results obtained by the pedestrian bridge research group at the University of Waterloo through their extensive crowd-testing program on a full-scale aluminum pedestrian bridge located at the university will aim to address both of these issues. The ultimate objectives of this experimental program are to validate or extrapolate existing analytical frameworks, and to develop new, practical models that can be used in a design guideline to better account for lateral vibrations and crowd-induced loading.


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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

STR-964: STUDIES ON VIBRATION SERVICEABILITY ASSESSMENT OF ALUMINUM PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES

London

Vibration serviceability is often the governing design factor for slender, lightweight footbridges. However, there is currently a large gap that exists between our understanding from a modeling perspective and their actual vibration behaviour. Recent experimental tests conducted at the University of Waterloo have underscored these discrepancies and have provided an unique opportunity to not only validate many of the models currently in use, but also to propose new modifications to better align with experimental test results. Specifically, issues such as how to design for lateral vibrations and crowd-induced loading and calibration of load factors, will be addressed in this presentation. Recent results obtained by the pedestrian bridge research group at the University of Waterloo through their extensive crowd-testing program on a full-scale aluminum pedestrian bridge located at the university will aim to address both of these issues. The ultimate objectives of this experimental program are to validate or extrapolate existing analytical frameworks, and to develop new, practical models that can be used in a design guideline to better account for lateral vibrations and crowd-induced loading.

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/Structural/100