Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

Remote-sensing information provides an effective basis for the rapid assessment of wind damage. The development of remote-sensing based assessments has received notable attention over the past decade, although automated algorithms have not yet achieved the speed, objectivity, and reliability desired for practical implementation in time-critical damage assessments. The current standard practice for making swift, objective, and widespread assessments of wind damage currently consists of rapid visual interpretation of first-available imagery. Techniques for rapidly accomplishing widespread damage assessments by visual inspection have been implemented in recent major tornado outbreaks in Birmingham-Tuscaloosa, Alabama and Joplin, Missouri (2011). Quickly emerging technologies, such as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and laser scanners, are helping to improve both the speed and the accuracy of damage assessments, in particular for rapid and target-specific data collection at very high spatial resolutions. Applications of these emerging technologies following recent severe tornadoes at Pilger, Nebraska (2014) and Pampa, Texas (2015) have demonstrated their role in helping to refine strategies for making rapid semi-automated damage assessments. Algorithms for comparing before-and-after remote sensing imagery are also of great interest for the future development of automated damage detection. Current development activities are centered on high-resolution before-and-after aerial images of recent tornado damage.


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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

NDM-506: CURRENT METHODS AND FUTURE ADVANCES FOR RAPID, REMOTE-SENSING-BASED WIND DAMAGE ASSESSMENT

London

Remote-sensing information provides an effective basis for the rapid assessment of wind damage. The development of remote-sensing based assessments has received notable attention over the past decade, although automated algorithms have not yet achieved the speed, objectivity, and reliability desired for practical implementation in time-critical damage assessments. The current standard practice for making swift, objective, and widespread assessments of wind damage currently consists of rapid visual interpretation of first-available imagery. Techniques for rapidly accomplishing widespread damage assessments by visual inspection have been implemented in recent major tornado outbreaks in Birmingham-Tuscaloosa, Alabama and Joplin, Missouri (2011). Quickly emerging technologies, such as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and laser scanners, are helping to improve both the speed and the accuracy of damage assessments, in particular for rapid and target-specific data collection at very high spatial resolutions. Applications of these emerging technologies following recent severe tornadoes at Pilger, Nebraska (2014) and Pampa, Texas (2015) have demonstrated their role in helping to refine strategies for making rapid semi-automated damage assessments. Algorithms for comparing before-and-after remote sensing imagery are also of great interest for the future development of automated damage detection. Current development activities are centered on high-resolution before-and-after aerial images of recent tornado damage.

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/NaturalDisasterMitigation/6