Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

MRAT is a made-in-Canada tool that overlays municipal data sets and insurance claims data onto an interactive map. The tool allows infrastructure managers to accurately identify areas with frequent insurance claims and easily identify where a more in-depth assessment should occur. The tool facilitates an understanding of risk factors to potentially impacted areas allowing owners to start to diagnose problems and generate solutions before flooding occurs. The process began with an original objective that would identify areas where there are an increased number of insurance claims. Early in its development, it became obvious that it could be a valuable tool for infrastructure managers. The team included three pilot municipalities from across the country that provided knowledge, data and feedback on the tool. As the power of the tool was developed and validated for municipalities and insurers, meteorologists were engaged to supplement the tool’s decision making capacity in developing future climate scenarios. On the surface, the tool is innovative because it a represents a marriage of datasets that do not naturally come together. With the unprecedented challenges of climate change and aging infrastructure, our standard practices and relationships need to be innovated. The tool provides objective proof that sharing information amongst stakeholders is valuable and benefit all parties including the public. Engineering is increasingly multi-disciplinary and there are exciting opportunities to facilitate continuous improvement by stretching traditional engineering paradigms. Prior to this tool, municipalities did not have access to claims information unless citizens took the initiative to report their claims.


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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

NDM-561: MUNICIPAL RISK ASSESSMENT TOOL (MRAT)

London

MRAT is a made-in-Canada tool that overlays municipal data sets and insurance claims data onto an interactive map. The tool allows infrastructure managers to accurately identify areas with frequent insurance claims and easily identify where a more in-depth assessment should occur. The tool facilitates an understanding of risk factors to potentially impacted areas allowing owners to start to diagnose problems and generate solutions before flooding occurs. The process began with an original objective that would identify areas where there are an increased number of insurance claims. Early in its development, it became obvious that it could be a valuable tool for infrastructure managers. The team included three pilot municipalities from across the country that provided knowledge, data and feedback on the tool. As the power of the tool was developed and validated for municipalities and insurers, meteorologists were engaged to supplement the tool’s decision making capacity in developing future climate scenarios. On the surface, the tool is innovative because it a represents a marriage of datasets that do not naturally come together. With the unprecedented challenges of climate change and aging infrastructure, our standard practices and relationships need to be innovated. The tool provides objective proof that sharing information amongst stakeholders is valuable and benefit all parties including the public. Engineering is increasingly multi-disciplinary and there are exciting opportunities to facilitate continuous improvement by stretching traditional engineering paradigms. Prior to this tool, municipalities did not have access to claims information unless citizens took the initiative to report their claims.

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/NaturalDisasterMitigation/41