Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

The National Building Code of Canada 2010 (NBCC) defines several loading combination scenarios for use in structural design. Appropriate combination factors are provided based on the probability of failure due to the simultaneous occurrence of the specified loads. Load Combination Cases 3 and 4 of Table 4.1.3.2.A include the combination of wind and snow loads, which are transient in nature. The recommended combination factors are intended to provide a uniform degree of reliability for design. However, in reality, the probability of the simultaneous loading due to wind and snow depends on the local meteorological climate. This probability can be more accurately simulated through the Finite Area Element (FAE) process, which studies the hour-by-hour accumulation and depletion of snow based on historical meteorological records. It takes into account variables such as wind speed and direction, temperature, humidity, water retention in a snow pack and many others. In the present work, the accumulation and depletion of snow on a modelled ground patch and the corresponding wind speeds were computed on an hourly basis to determine the correlation of wind and snow loads. Using this process, this paper investigates the interaction between wind and snow loads for 25 distinct regions in Canada, for both ground and roof snow loads.


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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

NDM-552: COMBINED PROBABILITIES OF PEAK WIND AND SNOW LOAD EVENTS

London

The National Building Code of Canada 2010 (NBCC) defines several loading combination scenarios for use in structural design. Appropriate combination factors are provided based on the probability of failure due to the simultaneous occurrence of the specified loads. Load Combination Cases 3 and 4 of Table 4.1.3.2.A include the combination of wind and snow loads, which are transient in nature. The recommended combination factors are intended to provide a uniform degree of reliability for design. However, in reality, the probability of the simultaneous loading due to wind and snow depends on the local meteorological climate. This probability can be more accurately simulated through the Finite Area Element (FAE) process, which studies the hour-by-hour accumulation and depletion of snow based on historical meteorological records. It takes into account variables such as wind speed and direction, temperature, humidity, water retention in a snow pack and many others. In the present work, the accumulation and depletion of snow on a modelled ground patch and the corresponding wind speeds were computed on an hourly basis to determine the correlation of wind and snow loads. Using this process, this paper investigates the interaction between wind and snow loads for 25 distinct regions in Canada, for both ground and roof snow loads.

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/NaturalDisasterMitigation/35