Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

While seismic hazard is generally moderate in eastern Canada, the seismic risk in urban area is increased by the density of the population, the value and the age of the infrastructure and the relative importance of the economic activities. Among the consequences of a seismic event, damages to infrastructures, such as bridges and overpasses, may compromise the safety of users and the free movement of people and goods. According to modern seismic codes and regulations, structures designed for seismic loading should sustain moderate to severe earthquakes with minimal and reparable damages and without collapse. However, older structures build prior to the introduction of seismic requirements in codes and standards, are more vulnerable and exposed to a high seismic risk. Geotechnical and geological site conditions may result in severe damages to the structures and contribute to their seismic vulnerability. This project proposes to extract these information using geographical information system (GIS) tools at the bridge sites and integrate this information in the seismic evaluation procedures. Local soil amplification and induced effects are integrated into scoring evaluation procedures and seismic risk studies. In this paper, the amplification phenomenon will be investigated by the compilation of existing data for the Saint-Lawrence valley and ambient noise measurements on soil and bridges. The aim of this study is to develop a susceptibility scale to the amplification effect based on GIS information. The results will contribute to a better estimation of the seismic vulnerability of bridges and overpasses to prioritize mitigation as well as post-earthquake interventions.


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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

NDM-502: INTEGRATION OF SITE CONDITIONS INFORMATION USING GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR THE SEISMIC EVALUATION OF BRIDGES

London

While seismic hazard is generally moderate in eastern Canada, the seismic risk in urban area is increased by the density of the population, the value and the age of the infrastructure and the relative importance of the economic activities. Among the consequences of a seismic event, damages to infrastructures, such as bridges and overpasses, may compromise the safety of users and the free movement of people and goods. According to modern seismic codes and regulations, structures designed for seismic loading should sustain moderate to severe earthquakes with minimal and reparable damages and without collapse. However, older structures build prior to the introduction of seismic requirements in codes and standards, are more vulnerable and exposed to a high seismic risk. Geotechnical and geological site conditions may result in severe damages to the structures and contribute to their seismic vulnerability. This project proposes to extract these information using geographical information system (GIS) tools at the bridge sites and integrate this information in the seismic evaluation procedures. Local soil amplification and induced effects are integrated into scoring evaluation procedures and seismic risk studies. In this paper, the amplification phenomenon will be investigated by the compilation of existing data for the Saint-Lawrence valley and ambient noise measurements on soil and bridges. The aim of this study is to develop a susceptibility scale to the amplification effect based on GIS information. The results will contribute to a better estimation of the seismic vulnerability of bridges and overpasses to prioritize mitigation as well as post-earthquake interventions.

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/NaturalDisasterMitigation/3