Location

London

Event Website

http://www.csce2016.ca/

Description

From September 29 to October 1, 2015 over 200 mm of rain deluged parts of southern New Brunswick. The catastrophic rain event washed away bridge size culverts and conventional bridges, including the surrounding soil and asphaltic concrete pavement. Also erosion encroached on the driving lane of road and highway embankments at over 100 locations. Several homes and businesses were left stranded. A fast and efficient means was required to assess the impact on infrastructure after the storm. This paper presents the procedure and outcomes of using digital imagery captured with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for post-disaster assessment. The use of a UAV to gather site images, at hard to access locations, allowed for the timely prioritization of needs and allocation of limited resources to areas most urgently in demand of emergency repairs. High quality aerial images were processed using commercial software specifically designed for the creation of 3D models and orthomosaics from aerial photos. This information, along with ground-level panoramas communicated the current condition of assets and roads. It provided engineers with the ability to complete initial assessment, create 3D models for design, and provide highly qualitative evaluation records. The successful use of a UAV for this storm event was preceded by other uses of UAVs for asset management within the New Brunswick Department of Transportation and Infrastructure.


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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

NDM-523: USE OF AN UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE (UAV) TO ASSESS TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE, IMMEDIATELY AFTER A CATASTROPHIC STORM EVENT

London

From September 29 to October 1, 2015 over 200 mm of rain deluged parts of southern New Brunswick. The catastrophic rain event washed away bridge size culverts and conventional bridges, including the surrounding soil and asphaltic concrete pavement. Also erosion encroached on the driving lane of road and highway embankments at over 100 locations. Several homes and businesses were left stranded. A fast and efficient means was required to assess the impact on infrastructure after the storm. This paper presents the procedure and outcomes of using digital imagery captured with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for post-disaster assessment. The use of a UAV to gather site images, at hard to access locations, allowed for the timely prioritization of needs and allocation of limited resources to areas most urgently in demand of emergency repairs. High quality aerial images were processed using commercial software specifically designed for the creation of 3D models and orthomosaics from aerial photos. This information, along with ground-level panoramas communicated the current condition of assets and roads. It provided engineers with the ability to complete initial assessment, create 3D models for design, and provide highly qualitative evaluation records. The successful use of a UAV for this storm event was preceded by other uses of UAVs for asset management within the New Brunswick Department of Transportation and Infrastructure.

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/csce2016/London/NaturalDisasterMitigation/16