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Abstract

Abstract

Although study abroad would appear to be an ideal context for the learning through doing and reflecting that constitutes experiential education, if it fails to be rigorously approached as experiential learning, it not only falls short of its potential, but also risks reinforcing rather than confounding consumerist assumptions and behaviours in education. Co-authored by five former academic exchange participants and their professor/program director (who had remained at the home university), the paper explores the need and various possibilities for programming that would pay more than lip service to the idea of international study as experiential learning. Facilitation of ongoing critical reflection and meaningful connections among students returning from study abroad, those arriving from elsewhere, and those at the home institution who had not studied abroad presents itself as a significant post-sojourn opportunity, with the potential to contribute to the transformation and internationalization of the institution itself.

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