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Abstract

This multi-voiced paper considers the role of language and linguistic heterogeneity in relation to larger discourses and processes of internationalization and globalization in Canadian higher education by examining two particular educational contexts in Ontario: newly arrived adult students participating in Immigrant language training programs; and Franco-Ontarian students transitioning to post-secondary schools and gaining access to higher education. The authors argue for a multidimensional conceptual approach to theorizing internationalization; one that takes into account the significance of language from the global, transnational and local levels of the social world whereby linguistic heterogeneity is viewed as the “norm” and one that allows for a broader and deeper engagement when considering what international education might mean for citizenship, integration, and linguistic minorities in Canada.

First Page

The role of language in processes of internationalization: Considering linguistic heterogeneity and voices from within and out in two diverse contexts in Ontario Abstract: This multi-voiced paper considers the role of language and linguistic heterogeneity in relation to larger discourses and processes of internationalization and globalization in Canadian higher education by examining two particular educational contexts in Ontario: newly arrived adult students participating in Immigrant language training programs; and Franco-Ontarian students transitioning to post-secondary schools and gaining access to higher education. The authors argue for a multidimensional conceptual approach to theorizing internationalization; one that takes into account the significance of language from the global, transnational and local levels of the social world whereby linguistic heterogeneity is viewed as the “norm” and one that allows for a broader and deeper engagement when considering what international education might mean for citizenship, integration, and linguistic minorities in Canada. Key words: language, globalization, internationalization, linguistic minorization, Newcomers to Canada, immigration, linguistic heterogeneity, ideologies of language Introduction Across varied contexts, educational institutions and organizations are continually being influenced by global shifts and more recently by processes associated with internationalization. According to DeWit & Knight (1997), internationalization of higher education is a process, a means to integrate international, intercultural, and peace dimensions into the university, and yet, at the same time, internationalization is a response to globalization (a process that overlaps but yet is distinct from globalization). At the university level, emanating from a top-down approach, internationalization has tended to discursively take shape as a neoliberal means of “branding” driven by competing global market forces in this new economy instead of attempting to integrate diverse, international perspectives and understandings in relation to

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