Event Title

Roundtable 3: Beyond Consuming/Producing Global Citizens: Toward Decolonizing Student Experiences

Start Date

4-11-2014 10:30 AM

End Date

4-11-2014 12:30 PM

Description

In relation to the other roundtables in this event which locate this institution, its policies and student mobility within globalization processes, this panel focuses on Huron's goal stated in our Academic Plan to inspire "critical global awareness" in our students as a matter of student experience.

Particular questions to be addressed:

  • How do we respond to student distrust of the hegemonic orders of privilege and domination that shape understandings of global relations?
  • How does our pedagogy deliberately undermine and unsettle (decolonize) existing orders of political, ideological and economic privilege that lead to exclusion, essentialism and stereotyping in places like the College?
  • How are our classrooms locations where orders of privilege are interrogated from our own disciplinary scholarship, and how does this further our students' critical global awareness?
  • What responsibilities and obligations does the institution have to take on in order to facilitate an ethical and responsible approach to engaging with the realities of global inequalities?
  • Can we address the pressures on our students to acquire 'global credentials' as part of their scholarly work that makes them less vulnerable to leaving their privilege un-interrogated?

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Nov 4th, 10:30 AM Nov 4th, 12:30 PM

Roundtable 3: Beyond Consuming/Producing Global Citizens: Toward Decolonizing Student Experiences

In relation to the other roundtables in this event which locate this institution, its policies and student mobility within globalization processes, this panel focuses on Huron's goal stated in our Academic Plan to inspire "critical global awareness" in our students as a matter of student experience.

Particular questions to be addressed:

  • How do we respond to student distrust of the hegemonic orders of privilege and domination that shape understandings of global relations?
  • How does our pedagogy deliberately undermine and unsettle (decolonize) existing orders of political, ideological and economic privilege that lead to exclusion, essentialism and stereotyping in places like the College?
  • How are our classrooms locations where orders of privilege are interrogated from our own disciplinary scholarship, and how does this further our students' critical global awareness?
  • What responsibilities and obligations does the institution have to take on in order to facilitate an ethical and responsible approach to engaging with the realities of global inequalities?
  • Can we address the pressures on our students to acquire 'global credentials' as part of their scholarly work that makes them less vulnerable to leaving their privilege un-interrogated?