Aboriginal Policy Research Consortium International (APRCi)
 

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2012

Journal

Leisure Sciences

Volume

34

Issue

1

First Page

39

Last Page

54

URL with Digital Object Identifier

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01490400.2012.633854

Abstract

In the context of rising chronic diseases amongst Indigenous peoples, there are calls for the adoption of more healthy “lifestyles.” In this context, this paper explores thoughts about physical activity from 21 Indigenous families through the voices of women and girls living in remote rural communities in the Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area, Australia. Speaking back to physical activity as a lifestyle “choice,” three consistent themes emerged: shame, gendered positioning, and welfarism. In conclusion, the perspectives of Torres Strait islanders and Northern Peninsula Area communities suggest that there are deeply embedded ways of thinking about the body, familial obligations, and the provision of and access to being active that are not consistent with Western health policies predicated upon individuals shouldering responsibility for “taking exercise.”


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